Herbal Foods and its Medicinal Values


Herbal Foods and its Medicinal Values

Author: H. Panda
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 8186623744
Code: NI96
Pages: 768
Price: Rs. 1,275.00   US$ 125.00

Published: 2003
Publisher: National Institute of Industrial Research
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Food has been a basic part of our existence. Through the centuries we have acquired a wealth of information about the use of food as a part of our community, social, national and religious life. It has been used as an expression of love, friendship and social acceptance without knowing the medicinal values of such food. India is one of the leading herbal food producer and exporter in the world. Traditional use of herbal medicines is recognized as a way to learn about potential future medicines. Several meticulous researches were conducted and experimented with herbal food. They arrived at more precise conclusions about the usefulness of diverse plants and herbs that are utilized in field like medicine. Now a day people are very much aware of the ingredients in synthetic drugs, the benefits of herbal products and harmful effects of chemical ingredients. Herbal medicines are in huge demand in the developed world for health care for the reason that they are efficient, safe and have lesser side effects. The formulations based on herbs are safe and effective. Herbal plants constitute a large segment of the flora, which provide raw materials for use by various industries. They have been used in the country for a long time for their medicinal properties. The decision to cultivate medicinal herbs should only be made in response to demand for particular herbs. The market is very competitive and could easily be oversupplied.
The major contents of the book are carbohydrates, chemistry of carbohydrates
daily requirement of carbohydrates, proteins, chemistry of proteins, some Indian food preparations rich in proteins, dynamic action of vitamin A, absorption and excretion of vitamin A, medicinal uses of ripe mango, mango in the treatment of night blindness etc.
This book for the first time reveals the exact medicinal characteristics and how it works and cures the different disease to make mankind healthy. This book is very useful for scientists, doctors, scholars as well as entrepreneurs.

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PART-I
NUTRITION
1. CARBOHYDRATES
Chemistry of Carbohydrates
Daily Requirement of Carbohydrates
Low Carbohydrate Foods
Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates
Bad effects of Excessive use of Carbohydrates
2. PROTEINS
Chemistry of Proteins
A-Class Proteins
Amino Acids
Essential Amino Acids
B-Class Proteins
C-Class Proteins
Foods Rich in A-Class Proteins
Some Indian Food preparations Rich in Proteins
Daily Requirement of Proteins
Digestion and Absorption of Proteins
Foods rich in Purine Bodies
Foods free from Purine Bodies
Nitrogen Balance in the Body
How is Protein Deficiency Caused?
How to Prevent and Cure Protein Deficiency
Contra-indications of Proteins
Clinical Indications of Proteins
3. FATS
Fats
Sources of Fats
Digestion of Fats
Absorption of Fats
4. MINERALS
Minerals
5. CALCIUM
Calcium-carbonate and Calcium-phosphate
Foods Rich in Calcium (in mg. 100 g.)
Daily Requirement (in mg.)
Absorption and Excretion of Calcium
Hypocalcaemia
General Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency
Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency in children
Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency in Women
More Calcium and Cancer
Treatment of Calcium Deficiency
General Symptoms of Hypercalcemia
Indications of Calcium Theraphy
6. PHOSPHORUS
Diseases Caused by Phosphorus Deficiency
Phosphorus Patents
7. IRON
Foods Rich in Iron: (in mg. per 100 g.)
Daily Requirement
Absorption and Excretion
General Deficiency of Iron
Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency
Iron Deficiency during Pregnancy and Childhood
Effects of Iron Deficiency during Childhood
Clinical Manifestations of Iron Deficiency
How to Cure Iron Deficiency?
Effects of Excessive use of Iron
Iron Intoxication
8. POTASSIUM
Foods Rich in Potassium (In mg. per 100 G.)
Deficiency Signs and Symptoms of Potassium
9. SODIUM
Sodium Phosphate
Sodium Sulphate
10. IODINE
11. SULPHUR
12. MAGNESIUM
13. CHLORINE
14. MANGANESE
15. COPPER
16. FLUORINE
17. MOLYBDENUM
18. COBALT
19. SILICON
20. ZINC
21. VITAMINS
Fat-Soluble-Vitamins
22. VITAMIN A
Chemistry of Vitamin A
Foods rich in Vitamin A
Some Indian Food preparations rich in Vitamin A
Daily requirement of Vitamin A
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin A
Absorption and excretion of Vitamin A
Signs and symptoms of Vitamin A deficiency
Clinical manifestations of Vitamin A
Indications of Vitamin A Therapy (Preventive and Curative
Some combined preparation of Vitamin A
23. VITAMIN D
Pharmacodynamics of Vitamin D
Chemistry of Vitamin D
Foods rich in Vitamin D
Daily Requirement of Vitamin D
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency
How to prevent and cure Vitamin D deficiency
Indications of Vitamin D Therapy
Hypervitaminosis D
24. VITAMIN E
Chemistry of Vitamin E
Foods rich in Vitamin E
Daily requirement of Vitamin E
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin E
Absorption and Excretion of Vitamin E
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin E deficiency
Clinical manifestations of Vitamin E
Dr. Gross, Method to Control Infertility
Male Fertility
Routine Approach to all Cases
The Preconceptional Profertility Regimen
Antenatal Routine in Secondary Sterility
Results
Previous Anencephalics and Foetal Abnormality
Patent preparations of Vitamin E
Some rare indications of Vitamin E and A combination
Biochemic remedies and Vitamin E absorption
25. WATER-SOLUBLE VITAMINS
26. VITAMIN B-COMPLEX GROUP
27. VITAMIN B1 (THIAMINE OR ANEURINE
HYDROCHLORIDE)
Chemistry of Vitamin B1
Foods rich in vitamin B1 (in mcg. per 100 g.)
Daily requirement of Vitamin B1
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin B1
2. Absorption and Excretion of Vitamin B1
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin B1 Deficiency
Clinical Manifestations of Vitamin B1
Indications of vitamin B1 Therapy
Dosage
28. VITAMIN B2 (RIBOFLAVINE)
Chemistry of Vitamin B2
Foods rich in Vitamin B2 (in mg. per 100 gr.)
Daily requirement of Vitamin B2
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin B2
Absorption and Excretion of Vitamin B2
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin B2 Deficiency
Indications of Vitamin B2 Therapy
29. VITAMIN B6 (PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE,
ADERMIN)
Chemistry of Vitamin B6
Foods rich in Vitamin B6
Daily requirement of vitamin B6
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin B6
Absorption and excretion of Vitamin B6
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin B6 Deficiency
Clinical manifestations of Vitamin B6
30. VITAMIN B12 (CYANOCOBALMIN)
Chemistry of Vitamin B12
Foods Rich in Vitamin B12 (Mcg. Per Gramme)
Daily requirement of Vitamin B12
Pharmacodynamics of Vitamin B12
Absorption and Excretion of Vitamin B12
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamins B12 deficiency
Indications of Vitamin B12 therapy
31. FOLIC ACID (PTEROYLGLTUAMIC ACID PGA)
Chemistry of Folic Acid
Foods rich in Folic Acid
Daily requirement of Folic Acid
Pharmacodynamic Action of Folic Acid
Absorption and Excretion of Folic Acid
Signs and Symptoms of Folic Acid
32. NICOTINIC ACID (NIACIN)
Chemistry of Nicotinic acid
Foods rich in Nicoinic Acid
Daily requirement of Nicotinic Acid
Pharmacodynamic Action of Nicotinic Acid
Absorption and Excretion of Nicotinic Acid
Signs and Symptoms of Nicotinic Acid Deficiency
Clinical Manifestations of Nicotinic Acid
3. Hartnup’s Disease (Hereditary Pellagra)
How to Cure Nicotinic Acid Deficiency
Indications of Nicotinic Acid Therapy
Patents of Nicotinic Acid
33. PANTOTHENIC ACID (P.A.)
Chemistry of P.A.
Foods rich in P.A.
Daily requirement of P.A.
Pharmocodynamic Action of P.A.
Absorption and Excretion of P.A.
Signs and Symptoms of P.A. deficiency
Clinical Manifestations of P.A.
34. LECITHIN
Lecithin Content of Various Substances in per cent
35. CHOLINE
Foods rich in Choline
Daily requirement of Choline
Signs and Symptoms of Choline Deficiency
Indications of Choline Therapy
36. INOSITOL
37. METHIONINE
38. BIOTIN
Para-Aminobenzoic Acid
39. VITAMIN C (ASCORBIC ACID)
Chemistry of Vitamin C
Foods rich in Vitamin C (in mg./l00 g.)
Daily requirement of Vitamin C
Pharmacodynamic action of Vitamin C
Absorption and Excretion of Vitamin C
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin C deficiency
Deficiency of Vitamin C in Children
How to prevent and cure Vitamin C deficiency
Clinical manifestations of Vitamin C
Indications of Vitamin C Therapy
40. VITAMIN K (ACETOMENAPHTHONE)
Chemistry of Vitamin K
Foods rich in Vitamin K
Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin K deficiency
Indications of Vitamin K Therapy
41. LAXOFLAVIN
42. VITAMIN P (BIOFLAVONOIDS)
43. REASONS FOR VITAMIN DEFICIENCY IN GENERAL
1. Diminished intake
2. Increased Requirement
3. Poor Absorption
4. Defective Utilization or Storage
5. Increased Excretion
44. B COMPLEX AND MULTI-VITAMIN
PREPARATIONS OF GREAT USE
45. ENZYMES
Animal Enzymes
Vegetable Enzymes
Indications of enzyme Therapy
Gastro-Entropathy
Pancreopathy
Cholepathy and Hepatopathy
PART-II
FOODS
46. FRUITS
Fruits
Chemical Analysis of Fruits
Nutritive and Medicinal Value of Fruits
Effects of fruits on various systems of body
47. APPLE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Apple and Gastro-Intestinal Diseases
Stomach Diseases
How to prepare unfermented apple juice
How to prepare apple-cider
How to prepare Apple-cider Vinegar
Uses
Leaves
Bark
48. APRICOT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Roots
49. BANANA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately: (one medium size)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Method of use
Flower
Stem
Banana as a tonic-food
Banana as a medicine in Gastro-intestinal Disorders
Banana as an ideal-food in infections
Banana in Diabetes and Obesity
Banana in Heart, Kidney and Liver diseases
Banana in Lung diseases
Peel
Banana Flower
Stem
Leaves
50. BULLOCKS - HEART
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
Bark
51. BREAD FRUIT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
52. CASHEW - FRUIT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Cashew-apple Juice
Cashew-apple Syrup
Cashew-apple Jam
Cashew-apple Candy
Cashew Wine
53. CHERRIES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
54. CUSTARD-APPLE
Food Values per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
55. CURRANTS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
56. DATES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
57. FIGS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
58. CLUSTER-FIGS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Bark
Sap
59. GRAPES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
Bark
How to prepare and preserve grape-juice
How to make good quality wines
Chemical Composition of wine
Uses of wine
Dangers of wine drinking
After-effects of various alcoholic beverages
Wine
Gin
Whisky
Brandy
Rum
Beer
Effect of alcohol on gravid uterus
How to stop drinking alcohol
60. GUAVA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Bark
Flowers
How to make Guava-jelly
61. JACK-FRUIT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Sap
Wood
Jack-fruit Nectar
Jack-fruit Jelly
62. JAMBUL FRUIT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Bark
Seeds
63. CITRUS FRUITS
64. LIME
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Lime-Peel: (Lemonis corter, B.P.)
Oil of Lemon: (Oleum-Limonis, B.P.)
Leaves
Seeds
How to prepare and preserve Lime-juice
How to prepare lime-barley water
Lime in vinegar
65. GRAPE-FRUIT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
66. POMELO
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Peel
Seeds
Leaves
67. ORANGE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Orange juice in Sports and hard labour
Peel
Flowers
How to make orange-squash
How to prepare orange-marmalade
68. BITTER-ORANGE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Peel
Orange-Oil
Orange-Flowers
69. SWEET-ORANGE
70. GIANT- LEMON OR CITRON
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
71. LOQUAT
72. MANGO
Food value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Green Mango
Medicinal Uses of Green Mango
Sap
Peel
Mango pickle
Preparation method
Mango Chutney
Method of preparation
Mango Chutney (Sweet)
Method of preparation
Why mango-pickle gets spoiled?
Uses of Mango pickle
Ripe-Mango
How to Prevent the Spoilage of Mangoes
Medicinal Uses of Ripe Mango
Mango in the Treatment of Night Blindness
Mangoes in the Prevention of Infections
Seed
Leaves
Flowers
Bark
Gum
Mango Squash
Mango Preserve
Mango Leather: (Aam-papad)
73. WATER-MELON
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Water-melon as a Beauty Aid
Seeds
74. MUSKMELON
Peel
Seeds
75. PALMYRA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Roots
76. PAPAYA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Ripe Fruit
Seeds
Leaves
Root
77. PASSION FRUITS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
78. PEACH
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
79. PEAR
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
80. PEAR-AVACADO
81. PINEAPPLE
A. Cosmosms
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
How to Prepare Pineapple Juice
Pineapple Jam
82. PLUMS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
83. POMEGRANATE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Sour Pomegranate
Seeds
Rind: or Granati Fructi Cortex. B.P.C.
Flowers
Leaves
Bark
84. RASPBERRY
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
85. STRAWBERRY
Food Value for 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
86. TOMATO OR LOVE APPLE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Raw Tomato
Ripe Tomato
Leaves
How to prepare Tomato Juice at Home and Preserve It
Tomato Ketchup
Method of Preparation
How to Grow Good Tomatoes at Home Garden
Pests and Diseases of Tomato
Control of the Pest
Discuses
Septoria
87. TODDY PALM-FRUIT
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
88. WOOD-APPLE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Sap
89. ZIZYPHUS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Seeds
Bark
PART-III
MISCELLANEOUS FRU
90. LITCHI
Leaves
Seed
91. MANGOSTEEN
92. MULBERRY
93. LANGSAT
94. FOX-BERRY
95. KAMRAKH
96. BELAMBOO
97. SAPOTA
Chemical composition
98. PHALSA
99. PRUNS
Leaves
100. QUINCE
Quince-Seeds: Behi-dana: (Urdu, Hindi).
PART-IV
LEAFY AND NON-LEAFY VEGES
Carbohydrates in Vegetables
Proteins in Vegetables
Fats in Vegetables
Minerals in Vegetables
Vitamins in Vegetables
Fibres in Vegetables
Hormones in Vegetables
Pectin in Vegetables
Nitrogen in Vegetables
The magic Chlorophyll in Vegetables
What is Chlorophyll
What is the Function of Chlorophyll
Some Golden Tips about eating Vegetables
How to keep your Vegetables Fresh
101. AGATHI
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Fruits and Flowers
Root
102. ALTERNANTHERA SESSILIS
Root
103. AMARANTH
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
104. AMARANTHUS SPINOSUS
105. AMARANTHUS VIRIDUS
106. AMARANTHUS POLYGAMUS
107. BAMBOO
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Bamboo Candy
Bamboo Chutney (Sweet)
Canning of Bamboo in Syrup
Canning of Bamboo in Brine
Canning of bamboo in curried Vegetables
108. BAMBOO MANNA
Ingredients:
Uses
Dose
109. BATHUA LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
110. BENGAL GARM LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
111. BITTER SWEET
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Berries
112. BRUSSEL SPROUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
113. CABBAGE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
114. CARROT LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
115. CELERY
Food Value for 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Root
Seeds
116. CORIANDER LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
117. CURRY LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Fruit
Bark
118. DRUM STICK LEAVES
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Vitamin A
Vitamin C Equal to:
Calcium
Fruits
Flowers
Bark
Root
Seeds
Gum
119. ENDIVE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Constituents
Seeds
Root
120. EVOLVULUS ALSONDIS
121. FENUGREEK
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
122. GARDEN CRESS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Roots
123. INDIAN SORREL
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Direction
124. IPOMOEA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
125. KHESARI LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
126. LETTUCE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
127. MINT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Menthol oil or (Oleum mentha pip B.P.C.)
Chemical Composition
Medicinal Uses
Menthol (Peppermint-ka-phool)
Medicinal uses of Menthol
Menthol Mixture
Directions for use of Menthol mixture
Children’s Colds
Cold in the head and chest
Sore throat and Colds
Influenza
Burns and Scalds
Minor cuts and Sores
Internal uses of Menthol Mixture
128. DILL-LEAVES
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Dill seeds
Dill Seed Oil
129. RED SORREL
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Root
130. SPINACH
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Indications of Spinach in Pediatrics
Indications of Spinach in Pregnancy
How to prevent Spinach spoilage
PART-V
MISCELLANEOUS VEGET
131. ARTHICHOKE
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
132. ASPARAGUS ADSCENDENS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
133. ASPARAGUS-SARMENTOSUS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
134. ATRIPLEX
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
135. ALLIUM ASCALONICUM
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
136. BOERHAAVIA DIFFUSA
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Root
137. BRAHAMI
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Brahami Hair Oil
Method of preparation
138. COLEUS AROMATICUS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
139. COLEUS PERVIFLOROUS
140. CANNA EDULIS
141. FLYSANTHUS HYSSOPIODES
142. OLDENLANDIA
143. PARSLANE
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
144. THICK LEAVED LAVENDER
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
145. TRICHODESMA INDICUM
PART-VI
NON-LEAFY VEGETAB
146. AMLA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Comparative food value of Amla
Amla Hair Oil
Preparation
Method of preparation
Seeds
Bark
Leaves
147. STAR-GOOSE BERRY
148. ASH GOURD
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Petha Sweet-meat or Candy
Seeds
Peel
149. BITTER GOURD
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Roots
150. BOTTLE GOURD
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Bottle gourd candy or halwa
Preparation Method
Uses
Peel
151. BRINJAL
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Seeds
152. BROAD BEANS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
153. DOUBLE BEANS
154. CALABASH CUCUMBER
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds and Leaves
155. CAULIFLOWER
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
156. CHOCHO MARROW
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physio pharmacology and Therapeutics
157. CLUSTER BEANS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
158. CUCUMBER
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
Root
159. FRENCH BEANS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
160. GOA BEANS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
161. KANDORI
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
162. KHAMRAK
163. LADY’S FINGER
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Roots
164. PEAS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately (3/4 cup)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
165. PUMPKIN
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
166. CUCURBITA PEPO
167. RIDGE GOURD
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Leaves
Root
168. BITTER RIDGE GOURD
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
169. SNAKE GOURD
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
170. WILD SNAKE GOURD
Leaves
Seeds
Roots
171. PARWAL
172. SOYA-BEAN
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Comparative food value of Soya-bean
Soya-bean milk
Comparative value of Soya-bean Milk with Cow's Milk
Soya-bean curds
Toxic factor in Soya-bean
173. SUNDAKAI
Food value per 100 g. approximately
174. SWORD-BEAN
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Roots
PART-VII
ROOTS AND TUBERS
175. BEET ROOT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Seeds
176. CARROT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately (1 large),
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Seeds
Spiced Carrot Juice
Carrot Halwa (Halwa-e-Gazar).
177. COLOCASIA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately.
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
178. ONION
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Seeds
179. POTATO
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
180. RADISH
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Seeds
181. SWEET POTATO
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
182. TAPIOCA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
183. TURNIP
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Seeds
184. YAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
PART-VIII
NUTS AND OIL SEEDS
185. ALMOND
Food Value per 100 g. appoximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Comparative food value of almonds
Almond Syrup
Almond oil: (Oleum amygdale B.P.)
Almond Shell
186. BRAZIL NUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
187. BUTTER-NUTS
Food value per 15 g. approximately
188. CASHEW NUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Bark
189. COCONUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Mythological Background of Coconut Tree
The Fruit
Kernel
Cancer and Coconut
Dry Kernel or Copra
Tender Coconut Water or (Eleneer)
Medicinal Uses of Tender Coconut Water
Tender Coconut Water in Cholera
Tender Coconut Water as a Substitute for Normal Saline
Tender Coconut Water in Infections
Tender Coconut Water as a Cosmetic
Coconut Oil: (Oleum cocois B.P.)
Uses of Coconut Oil
Flower
Coir
Shell
Coconut Toddy
Leaves
Stem
Roots
190. CHESTNUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
191. COBNUT
Food Value per 100g. approximately
192. CUDPAHNUTS OR ALMONDS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
193. FILBERT NUT
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
194. GROUNDNUT OR PEANUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Essential Amino Acids (per l00 g. proteins)
Comparative Food Value of Groundnuts
Groundnuts in Obesity
Groundnuts in Diabetes
Groundnuts in Cardiovascular Disorders
Preparation of Groundnut Milk
Chemical Composition of Groundnut Milk
Uses of Groundnut Milk
Preparation of Curds
Food Value of groundnut curds per 100 g.
Fear of Cancer by Eating Groundnuts
Groundnut Butter
Groundnut Candies
Groundnut Biscuits
Groundnut Oil (oleum Arachis B.P.C.)
Groundnut Cake
195. PISTACHIONUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
196. WALNUT
Food Value per 100g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Leaves
Bark
197. WATER CHESTNUT
Physiochemical Characteristics of Water Chestnut
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
198. CASTOR SEED
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Castor Oil (oleum Ricini B.P.)
Chemistry of Castor Oil
Chemical Composition
Castor Leaves
Roots
199. COTTON SEED
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Cotton seeds
Cotton Seed Oil (Oleum Gossypii seminis, B.P.)
Leaves
Flowers
Bark
200. GINGELLY SEEDS
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Gingelly Oil (Oleum Sesami B.P.C.)
Leaves
201. OLIVE OIL
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
202. SAFFLOWER SEED
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Flowers
Safflower Oil
203. SUNFLOWER SEEDS
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
PART-IX
CEREALS OR MILLETS
204. BAJARA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
205. BARLEY
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
206. OATS
Food value per 100 g. approximately
207. JAWAR
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
208. ITALIAN MILLET
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
209. MAIZE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
210. RAGI
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
How to Prepare Good Quality Ragi Malt
Food Value of the malt per 100 g. approximately
211. RICE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Physical Structure of Rice
Digestibility of Rice
Effect of par-boiling Paddy
Nutritive Value of Fermented Rice
212. ROUGH CHAFF
Food Value per cent approximately
Essential Amino Acids per 16 g N (per cent)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
213. WHEAT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Physical Structure of Wheat
Chemical composition of Endosperm per 100 g.
approximately
Chemical composition of bran per 100 g. approximately
Chemical composition of germ per 100 g. approximately
Wheat Products
Whole Wheat Flour
White Wheat Flour
Semolina (Soji or Rava)
Brown Bread (whole wheat flour)
White Bread
Digestibility of Bread
How to Select a Good Quality Bread
Chapaties
Macaroni
214. FAREX
PULSES
215. BENGAL GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
216. BLACK GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
How to Prepare Good Quality Papad
(Black gram dal wafers)
Method of Preparation
Leaves
Roots
217. COW-GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
218. FIELD BEAN
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
219. GREEN GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
220. HORSE GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Horse Gram in the Treatment of Urinary Calculi
How Urinary Stones are Formed
Kinds of Urinary Stones or Calculi
1. Phosphatic Calculi
2. Uric acid Calculi
3. Oxalate Calculi
4. Cystine Calculi
5. Xanthine Calculi
6. Staghorn Calculi
Signs and Symptoms of Urinary Stones
Management of Renal Colic
Leaves
221. KHESRI DAL
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
222. LENTIL
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
223. RED-GRAM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Essential Amino Acids (g. per 100 g. protein)
Medicinal Value
PART-XI
SPICES
Uses of Spices
224. ASAFOETIDA
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Hing in Gynaecology and Obstetrics
225. CARDAMOM
Food Value per 100 g. approximately (Nelliampathy
Estate Cardamom seeds)
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
226. CHILLIES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Rutin
Red Chillies
227. CINNAMON
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Cinnamon Oil (Oleum cinnamomi, B.P.)
Chemical Composition
228. CLOVE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Clove Oil (Oleum caryophylli B.P.)
Chemical Composition
229. CORIANDER
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
230. CUMIN
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
231. GARLIC
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Garlic is an Excellent Tonic
Preparation of Makradhwaja
Chemical Composition
Pharmacological Action
Therapeutics of Makradhwaja
232. GINGER
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
233. MACE AND NUTMEG
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Nutmeg
Nutmeg Oil. Oleum Myristicae B.P.
Chemical Composition
234. OMUM
Food value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Ajowan Oil (Oleum Ajowan I.C.A.)
Chemical Composition
Thymol (Ajowan ka-phool or Sat-e-ajowan, B.P.)
235. PEPPER
Food value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Confectio Pepper
236. SAUNF
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Saunf Oil (Oleum foeniculi B.P.C.)
Leaves
Root
237. SINAPIS
Food value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Mustard Oil (Oleum sinapis expressum)
238. TAMARIND
Food value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Chemical Composition
Leaves
Flowers
Bark
Seed
239. TURMERIC
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
PART-XII
MISCELLANEOUS FOODS
240. ARECA NUT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
Chemical Composition
241. ARROWROOT
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal value
242. BETEL LEAVES
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
Oral Cancer and Betel Leaves Chewing
What is Cancer ?
What Causes Cancer ?
Which are the Most Common Sites of Cancer ?
Who Gets Cancer Easily ?
Is Cancer Curable ?
How to Detect Early Cancer ?
How Betel-chewing Causes Cancer ?
Clinical Findings in Group A
The Factors that Cause Cancer by Chewing Betel Leaves
How to prevent and cure oral cancer
Other uses of betel leaves
243. COCOA
Food Value per cup of cocoa
(milk 8 ozs, cocoa 6 g. sugar 15 g.)
Medicinal Value
Chemical Composition of Cocoa
244. COFFEE
Food Value per cupful of coffee having 6 ounces
decoction, 2 ounces milk and 15 g. sugar.
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Difference between C. Arabica and C. Robusta
C. Arabica
C. Robusta
Chemical Composition of Coffee per cent
Roasting and Grinding
How to Prepare Good Coffee
Uses of Coffee
Bad Effects of Coffee
245. HONEY
Food Value per 100 g. 5 table spoons approximately
Chemical Composition
Physiopharmacology and Therapeutics
Honey Comb
246. KOLA
Medicinal Uses
Chemical Composition
247. SAGO
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
248. SUGAR CANE
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
249. SUGAR
250. TEA
How to Prepare Good Tea
Uses of Tea
Bad Effects of Drinking Tea in Excess
Foods Rich in Fluorides (Dry foods ppm)
How Hyperfluoridation Occurs
Signs and Symptoms of Hyperfluorosis
Defluoridation of Water
251. VINEGAR
Vinegar or Sirka
252. YEAST
Food Value per 100 g. approximately
Medicinal Value
Caution
253.   Poppy Seeds

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Coconut

Coconut: Cocos nucifera: (B.N.); Tirnarapa or Sadaphala: (Sans.); Narial: (Hindi, Urdu, Dak.); Thengina kai: (Kan.); Nargil: (Arab.); Joze-Hindi: (Pers.); Theng: (Tam., Mal.); Doonghi: (Sindhi); Narikel: (Beng.); Koparaha: (Pashtu.).

Family: Palmae or Palmaceae.

Zodiac: Aries.

Food Value per 100 g. approximately

Carbohydrate13 g.Vitamin A Trace
Protein4.5 g.Vitamin B145 mcg.
Fat41.6 g.Vitamin B2100 mcg.
Calcium11 g.Niacin0.8 mg.
Phosphorus240 mg.Vitamin C 17 mg.
Iron2 mg.Sodimu17 mg.
Copper0.32 mg.Potassium426 mg.
Chlorine114 mg.Digesting Time 3½ Hrs.
Magnesium52 mg.CALORIES445

Essential Amino acids (g/100 g. Protein)

Arginine12.1Histidine1.7
Isoleucine4.5Leucine6.7
Lysine3.8Cystine1.6
Methionine4.3Phenylalanine4.3
Threonine3.2Tryptophan0.8
Valine5.3

Constitution: Hot and Dry 2o.

Mythological Background of Coconut Tree

According to HOLY VEDAS, coconut tree is named as KALPA-VRIKSHA or The tree of Heavens. It is believed that LORD VISHNU, the most charming God of Hindu mythology, the protector of the entire universe, when came on this beautiful earth. He brought three protecting Gods with Him. They were: Universal Mother LAKSHMI as His beloved wife, KAMADHENU a wonderful Divine cow that had the boon to give anything you desire and KARPAGAVALLI or the Coconut tree. It means giver of all health, energy, strength, tranquillity, longevity and peace.

From ancient times, Dravadians in South India, also considered coconut tree as very sacred and auspicious. They named this tree as Tennam-pillai. It means that coconut tree should be carefully tended like your own son.

Coconut tree grows luxuriously along the entire coast of the sea and it thrives well in loose sandy soil. Its age varies between 120 to 200 years. Among all the trees that grow on the earth, it is believed that coconut tree is endowed with a wonderful sense of understanding human voices and it is observed that coconut tree grows better in school compounds where children play, sing and scream in their innocent shrill voice.

Coconut tree is a boon to mankind for, it supplies all the bare necessities of the man. It is interesting to read a passage from the book Vegetable world by Lois Figuier, 'Imagine a traveller passing through one of these countries situated under a burning sky; panting and despirited, the poor traveller at length perceives a hut surrounded by some trees. He sees no cultivated lands except some coconut trees around the hut. He is soon beneath the hospitable roof. His host offers him drink and repast with various dishes. The astonishing traveller asks who in this desert country furnishes him with all these things. 'My coconut tree was the reply'. 'The drink I presented you with on your arrival was drawn from the fruit before it is ripe, and some of the nuts which contain it weigh 3 or 4 lb. This kernel so delicious and delicate in its flavour is the fruit when it is ripe. This milk which you find so agreeable is prepared from the kernel. The cabbage whose flavour is so delicate, is the top of the coconut which we rarely regale ourselves with the delicacy, for the tree from which the cabbage is cut dies soon after. The wine with which you are so satisfied is furnished by the coconut tree. The sap has supplied the sugar with which these sweet meats are made. The vessels and utensils have been made out of the shell of the nut'.

'Nor is this all: I entirely depend on these invaluable trees for my habitation. With this wood my cabin is constructed. These leaves dried placed form the roof. Made into an umbrella they shelter me in my walks. The clothes that cover me are woven out of the fibres of their leaves and fruit. These mats that serve so many useful purposes are produced by them also. The sifter which you see was ready made to my hand in that part of the tree whence the leaves issue. With these same leaves woven together we can make sails for ships: The species of fibre that envelops the nut is preferable to tow ship. It does not rot in the water and it swells in imbibing it. It makes excellent string and all sorts of cable and cordage. Finally the delicate oil that has seasoned many of our dishes, and that which burns in my lamp is expressed from fresh kernels'.

The beautiful coconut palm benefactor of mankind has stood the test of time against many ravages of nature. He writes, 'There are some 1200 species of palms. Among them the most beautiful and most widely spread palm is coconut tree. It is true that the date palm is an important source of food to the Arabs but it has no such general distribution'. With all these uses coconut tree is aptly called as a tree of Heavens by our wise ancestors.

The Fruit

Coconut varies in size and colour and bear in clusters in the form of bunches hanging from the top most stem. Each bunch bears about 20 to 30 fruits and there are four to five such bunches. When the fruit is tender it is yellowish pale-green and as it begins to ripe, turns into light brown and falls off its own.

The fruit is enveloped with a fibrous mass under which there is a horny shell that hosts the kernel or endosperm and water.

Since coconut is a fruit of a heavenly tree, it has held a very high place in all religious ceremonies. It is offered as a token of devotion while celebrating puja in the temple of various deities. Particularly breaking a coconut in front of the passage of Anjaniah Swamy's temple is considered as very auspicious. Offering a coconut to every guest during marriage ceremonies is considered as a sacred gift bringing heaps of blessings to the newly wed.

Kernel

Kernel or the endosperm is found attached beneath the shell. It is this fleshy portion that is largely consumed as food. Mostly it is used in the preparation of various curries and sweetmeats.

Besides the various food components, kernel is chemically fortified with various enzymes like: Lignin, Investin, Oxydase, Catalase, Monitol, (coconut sugar), Albumin, Tartaric acid etc.

Jelly like kernel of the tender coconut is free from fibres and get easily digested without leaving any residue. Therefore, it can be safely given to children in the form of mash with bananas and milk. It can also be safely given to persons suffering from indigestion, gastric ulcers, stomach cancer, colitis, typhoid, hepatitis, jaundice, diarrhoea, dysentery, piles and after surgical operations. It is an useful food for diabetics, because it does not contain fat and starch. Applying the tender kernel over the ulcers, imparts a cool sensation and heals them quickly. Massaging the fresh kernel over the face daily, cures pimples, prevents early appearance of wrinkles and keeps ones face flower fresh.

Ripe kernel is rich in fat but deficient in carbohydrate. Even though it is a high calorie food that supplies about 445 calories per 100 g., its moderate use in the form of desiccated coconut mixed with wheat flour from which chapaties are prepared serve as a valuable food for diabetics who are taking regular treatment. Author has been using coconut in this form in all the diabetics without any harm and complication. He usually advices them to use a handful of grated coconut once in four days.

Cancer and Coconut

Author observes that persons who chew coconut along with betel leaf and areca-nut rarely suffer from any cancerous growth in their mouth. He happens to examine one of his friends from Northern India. He is the religious head of an institution and is about 42 years old. He eats pan supari with tobacco at least 20 to 25 times daily and he is addicted to this from 30 years. After examining him carefully the author found nothing abnormal except discoloured teeth. It is confirmed that he never eats the leaves unless the mixture is mixed with a piece of fresh coconut kernel. After this tip, author examined number of persons who either had the family history of cancer or who were addict to tobacco and pan supari and found that those who regularly chewed dry or fresh coconut kernel were free from any sign of cancer in spite of excessive use of pan supari. The author believes that either the coconut has natural radium or cobalt which prevents the cancerous effect or the oil may protect the mucus membrane of the cheeks from constant irritation. He wonders, if some scientist doing research in cancer can take this tip and do some research and find how coconut prevents the development of cancer.

Milk of the kernel forms a very valuable food for children who are suffering from protein deficiency, rickets and abdominal tuberculosis. It can be safely given as a regular feed by mixing it with tender coconut water. It is an excellent liquid food for aged persons.

Coconut milk mixed with a tablespoonful of poppy seed milk and pure honey one tablespoonful; taken every night before going to bed is an effective medicine for dry cough due to throat irritation or due to excessive smoking, chest pain without any alarming cause, diarrhoea and dysentery.

A glassful of coconut milk taken early in the morning followed with an ounce of castor oil after three or four hours, is found to act excellently in eradicating the tapeworm.

Chewing a piece of fresh coconut along with jaggery is an excellent sweet-meat for children. It hardens the gums, prevents dental caries and halitosis.

Externally, fresh coconut milk is applied with glycerine as a cosmetic to whiten the complexion, cure chopped hands and soles.

Desicated fresh coconut is a boon in trauma. It is fried and fomented on the injured part with excellent results. It is always remembered that any injury however simple should it be, great care of a surgeon is required, therefore, after using fried grated kernel as a first aid, the patient should be moved to the nearest hospital.

Dry Kernel or Copra

Dry kernel is sweet and contains more fat. It contains Sodium 30 mg. and Potassium 700 mg. per 100 g.

Chewing dry kernel along with sugarcandy is an effective medicine for ulcerative stomatitis and glossitis due to B-complex deficiency with all these benefits and uses, God has provided us food and medicine in one fruit in the form of coconut.

Tender Coconut Water or (Eleneer)

Chemical composition

Carbohydrate4 g.Vitamin C2 mg
Protein0.1 g.Sodium50 mg.
Fat0.1 g.Potassium600 mg.
Calcium20 mg.Magnesium80 mg.
Phosphorus10 mg.Chlorine100 mg.
Iron0.7 mg.CALORIES 17

pH value of is 5.6 and the other nutrients present in tender coconut water.

Glucose2.1 per centFructose3.8 per cent
Insulin152 mg. per centProteins 180 mg. per cent
Potassium49 mEq. per litreMagnesium 17 mEq. per litre
Chloride 62 mEq. per litrePhosphate 8 mEq. per litre
Sulphate5 mEq. per litre

Medicinal Uses of Tender Coconut Water

In India, tender coconut water is used as a cooling medicine and as a most sacred and pure water from vedic period. Even to day, it is offered as a Sacred water or Tirtha in the temples and the water is used to bathe the Deities. Every one knows the cooling value of tender coconut and a lemon all over India. Tender coconut's water is drunk daily during summer as a most refreshing and cooling drink. The water is pleasantly sweetish-salt and leaves a feeling of complete satisfaction from thirst.

Tender coconut water contains a very high concentration of potassium and chlorine in sterilized water. Its use during the treatment of heart, liver and kidney disorders, general dropsy, scanty urination, toxaemia of pregnancy, B-coli infection, albuminuria, high acidity of urine, gonorrhoea and as an adjuvant in the treatment with salicylates, sulphonamides and wherever sodium is contra indicated, is found effective with very gratifying results. It is the cheapest food diuretic that protects from the bad effects of excessive use of oral chlorothiazide diuretics. In kidney failure, tender coconut water should be very carefully given under the strict supervision of a physician.

The author is using tender coconut water in the treatment of various diseases with very effective results. Particularly, tender coconut water with fresh lime juice is a boon to infants, children and adults, to cure dehydration. Giving a teaspoon at a time every ten minutes not only quenches thirst but also restores the electrolyte balance in infants and children where emergency saline transfusion facilities are not available.

For vomiting in children due to ascending of a roundworm in the stomach, tender coconut water with lime juice is a specific medicine. Parents are afraid of giving tender coconut water to infants and children. It is assured that there is no harm in giving 4 to 6 ounces of tender coconut as a routine food to every infant after the third day of birth. Mixing tender coconut water instead of plain water in milk, not only nourishes the child, but also prevents the curdling of milk in the stomach and prevents vomiting, constipation and indigestion. Tender coconut water in which a well ripe banana is mashed can be regularly given as a perfect food instead of milk. Children grow healthier by regular use of this food.

Tender Coconut Water in Cholera

Cholera is a very serious infectious disease in which the cholera germs enter our digestive tract along with contaminated food and drinks and cause inflammation due to which severe diarrhoea and vomiting occurs. Severe loss of water and other key minerals like potassium and sodium, due to diarrhoea and vomiting, a state of dehydration sets, and one dies of acidosis and shock.

Tender coconut water 8 to 12 ounces mixed with a teaspoonful of fresh lime juice administered orally is well tolerated by the patient and rectifies the electrolyte balance neutralizing the acidosis of the blood. Author has been using tender coconut water and lime juice along with Terramycin pfizer 250 mg. 1 capsule every four hourly as soon as the patient starts vomiting and passing loose stools.

During the recent outbreak of cholera epidemics in Mysore, the author treated number of acute cholera cases with tender coconut water, lime juice and Terramycin 250 mg. 1 capsule every 4 hours with gratifying results. Supplementing Furoxsone Smith Kline and French 100 mg. 1 Tablet with tender coconut water 8 to 12 ounces four hourly, is also found to be effective in early stages of cholera. Researchers at School of Tropical Medicine confirmed and announced: 'In view of the potential hazard of the intravenous administration of potassium salts under epidemic conditions efforts were directed at the school to establish a practical and economical oral potassium repletion regimen.'

'Green coconut water is a known source of potassium rich fluid and since cholera patient can almost invariably ingest oral fluids following initial correction of shock and acidosis, the experts suggested imbibing of coconut-water as a must for cholera patients'.

Tender Coconut Water as a Substitute for Normal Saline

Tender coconut water transfused directly from the nut is used by the author with excellently good results. After the intensive clinical research and careful investigation the author claims that running the fluid at the rate of 20 to 25 drops per minute by inserting the sterilized transfusion set after painting the chopped portion with tincture iodine helps the fluid to pass through transfusion filter and reduces the risk of needle block. It is found that about ¾ part of the water is sufficient for a person who is 50 per cent dehydrated. It is advised that tender coconut water transfusion should be restricted only in emergency and should not be repeated, because of the probabilities of the formation of antibodies. Doctors have also clinically tried and found that tender coconut water can be safely used as a substitute for normal saline in dehydration caused by various gastro-intestinal disorders. It is more economical and aptly said 'If all the claims made for two substitutes proves uniformly good as expected, the common man will find that he will have to pay very much less for medicine and drugs.

Tender Coconut Water in Infections

All infectious cause fever and due to high body temperature various biochemical functions of the body get impaired. Tender coconut water being rich in potassium and other minerals plays a major role to increase the urinary output and helps the elimination of sulpha drugs and other antibiotics that are usually administered during infections. Also, this mineral water aids the quick absorption of the drugs and makes their peak concentration in the blood easier by its electrolytic effect. This quick dispersal of the drugs leaves a lethal effect on the micro organisms and cures the disease earlier with low doses of drugs. Tender coconut water can be safely given in typhoid, colitis, smallpox, chicken-pox, measles, dysentery, diarrhoea, diphtheria, pneumonia, bronchitis, nephritis, cystitis, general toxaemia of pregnancy and after major surgical operations.

Tender Coconut Water as a Cosmetic

Washing the face daily with tender coconut water is an excellent medicine to cure pimples, black heads. Its regular use prevents the early appearance of wrinkles on the face, dryness and takes the care of complexion.

Mix a teaspoonful of turmeric paste in a glassful of tender coconut water and set it overnight. Then add Red-sandal powder 3 teaspoons and stir the ingredients well. Leave the mixture undisturbed for 3 days. Then strain the liquid through three folded layers of fine muslin cloth. Preserve this liquid in a clean bottle and apply freely twice daily over the face and see how the lovely face blooms with beauty. It is preferable to cheap snows and other cosmetics.

Drinking tender coconut water mixed with a tablespoonful of honey is a very effective and cheap nerve tonic. It stimulates sex centres and prevents the bad effects of sexual indulgence. It is a medicine for chronic bronchitis, constipation and piles.

Fresh kernel is ground with a glassful of tender coconut water with sugarcandy and one cardamom is given once daily to cure chest pain, dryness in the lungs due to working in dusty atmosphere, hiccough, insomnia, gastric ulcer etc.

A handful of raw rice is soaked in tender coconut water in its own shell until it is fully fermented. Then the rice is ground into fine paste and applied daily for three to four days as a medicine for chopped hands, soles, pimples, dry itching, eczema, discolouration of skin etc., with excellently good results.

Tender coconut water mixed with a pinch of turmeric powder and equal quantity of lime water (Calcium hydroxide) is applied as a very soothing dressing for burns, scalds and burning sensation in the soles and palms.

Coconut Oil: (Oleum cocois B.P.)

Coconut oil is extracted from fresh as well as dry kernel of the fruit. It looks pearl-white when it is solid at low temperature. It melts quickly and looks pale-yellowish in colour. It contains a peculiar coconut smell, which becomes more on exposure the air. Refined coconut oil is free from any colour and smell. Such vacuum refined coconut oil like: Cocovite is recommended for all indications of coconut oil.

Pure coconut oil contains Caprilic, lyric-myristic and palmitic acid. It also contains trimyristin, tristerin, tripalmitin and triolein. It is soluble in alcohol, ether and chloroform. It forms soaps on mixing with alkalies. Marine soap is prepared from coconut oil.

Uses of Coconut Oil

Refined coconut oil is mostly used in the manufacture of vegetable ghee, margarine. It is an ideal cooking medium for all dishes like: chapaties, puries, bhajis, dhoklas, vegetables, sweet-meats, omlets, cutlets, salad etc. Refined coconut oil does not cause any indigestion due to the removal of indigestible free fatty acid, that is commonly found in all common edible oils. It does not fume, does not foam, does not froath and does not lose its flavour at high temperature. It has been used as a substitute for butter and Cod-liver oil. It can be moderately used by high-blood pressure diabetic and obese persons.

Coconut oil is externally applied as a very emollient substance. Its daily application mixed with few drops of fresh lime juice and equal quantity of lime water (Calcium hydroxide) forms an effective beauty aid. Its application over the face every night cures pimples, bleaches and nourishes the skin, prevents dryness, early appearance of wrinkles, cleans the tiny pores and helps the skin to breath normally. The same applied over the chopped skin, cracked nipple, napkin rash, helps them to heal quickly.

Daily application of refined coconut oil mixed with lime water and lime juice on the hair, prevents hair fall and lengthens the hair. It gives a brilliant look to the hair. Snow white cream can be prepared by rubbing the mixture without lime juice. It looks like Brylcream, and can be used instead of this noted hair dressing.

Applied over the skin, the pure coconut oil quickly absorbs into the skin, therefore, it is an ideal base for medicated ointments. Mixed with equal quantity of pure cow's butter is daily massaged over the body of a child and exposed to morning sun, helps him or her to grow strong and healthy. Application of coconut oil over the newly born infant, helps to remove the adherent matter from the body, prevents its body-heat and bad effects of exposure to cold winds.

A garlic clove and a clove is roasted in coconut oil until they turn brown. Few drops of this medicated oil is put in ears as a specific folk-medicine for ear-ache due to exposure to cold (It is advised that treating acute ear infections with home remedies should be avoided to prevent serious infection like otitis media, mastoiditis etc.).

A piece of onion is roasted in coconut oil, and few drops are put in both the nostrils without inhaling air through nose, to relieve nasal congestion due to cold. Care must be taken to prevent oil inhalation. Oil in the lungs causes serious complications.

Equal quantity of fresh jasmin leaf juice with coconut oil, and a teaspoonful of mustard seeds per 2 ounces of the mixture is heated until the watery content is evaporated. Its daily application over the shaft of the penis for a couple of months, develops the under developed organ, strengthens and hardens it by letting more blood and retaining it in large quantity when it is in erection. It is warned to avoid glans manipulation with hand which develops the habit of masterbation. The oil massaged over the breasts makes them firm.

Burning coconut oil in lamps gives a smokeless flame, emits cool light and protects the eyes from getting refractive errors.

Application of unrefined coconut oil over the glans and internal vaginal canal before conjugal union, acts as an effective contraceptive. Addition of a pinch of alum or common salt before the application of oil increases the contraceptive effect. A tampoon dipped in coconut oil inserted in the vagina is also a more effective aid than mere oil smearing. It is about 95 per cent safe and a cheap method. Oil also helps as a lubricant for dry vagina and pain during intercourse.

Pure coconut oil mixed with a pinch of turmeric powder is applied to cure vaginitis, caused by mild fungus infection. (For severe fungus infection like: trachomanas, monalia etc. Flagyl (M & B) 1-3 tablets per day, given orally is found to be a specific medicine. Gyno-sterosan (Geigy) S.V.C. (M & B) are some of the potent local vaginal tablets inserted twice daily in such gynaecological disorders).

Coconut flour: Nutritive value of coconut flour is prepared by Azotropic process from the fresh kernel at C.F.T.R.I., Mysore. This product is found to be a very effective and a cheap substitute for A class proteins and various edible, preparations such as, coconut meal, coconut flakes, coconut protein concentrate can be made from coconut flour.

Coconuts can be preserved by treating them with lime to avoid contamination with fungus. This process helps better yield of unspoiled kernel, good quality oil and softer fibre.

Flower

Helping an unborn infant to make it more beautiful is really a difficult problem but one can confidently try this method and confirm how simple and effective it is.

The would be mother is advised to act as follows:

  1. As soon as you know that you are blessed with a new life, thank God for having given you a most wonderful treasure in the world that one has.
  2. If this bounty is the first one, you must not worry, because you may experience new feelings like: nausea, vomiting, tiredness etc., during the first three months. These are only temporary symptoms which can be controlled by taking siquil (squibbs) 5-10 mg. 1 to 2 tablets daily or a teaspoonful of Pyrovin Elixir B.P.W. 3 times daily under the guidance of a physician.
  3. Have plenty of rest, eat fresh fruits, vegetables and drink milk with honey liberally. May be you are weak, for which take Gevral (Lederle) or Netabec (P.D.) 1 capsule 2 times daily during the entire months of pregnancy.
  4. Regular checkup by a physician is always a safe guide during this blessed time.
  5. From the beginning of the third month, drink a glassful of unfermented juice of coconut flower Spike (the one that is used as a sacred offering in the marriages), with a teaspoonful of honey and lime-juice once daily until the end of 34 weeks of pregnancy.
  6. Psychologists believe that right thinking, living in beautiful surroundings, moderate exercise and regular daily prayer to God, also plays a very vital role in moulding the new infant most harmoniously.

The author has been using this medicine from several years in a number of patients with excellently good results. Some physicians use only the plain juice of the spikes. But addition of honey and lime juice enhances the effect of this medicine.

Coir

The fibre from the husk that envelops the coconut shell is known as coir. It is a very useful product for making numerous useful articles like: ropes, mats, carpets, upholstery, saddles and hard boards.

Ash of coir, particularly the fine one that envelops the shell contains styptic properties. It is therefore used with tender coconut water and sugarcandy in ½ to 1 teaspoonful doses once or twice daily as a medicine to cure excessive menstrual bleeding in young girls, bleeding piles, excessive thirst during summer, bilious vomiting, excessive acidity in the stomach, gastric ulcer, hiccough etc.

A cupful decoction of the coir given with a teaspoonful of honey is used with gratifying results to expel round and tapeworm. Adding lime juice, dry grape seeds, cardamom and a pinch of table salt to the infusion of the coir is used as a folk-medicine in morning sickness.

Shell

The shell of the coconut is hard and light brown in colour. It can be used for decorative purposes after washing it with washing soda and then rubbing it with coconut oil. This process gives a black shade to the shell. Shell is used as a cheap fuel for cooking and gas engines. The cup like shell is used for varieties of domestic uses, such as: bowels, ladles, hooka, etc. Painted lacquered inlay work with metal, fancy ornaments like: bangles, buttons, tea sets, spoons, rings are beautifully made from shell. It is a home industrial product in Kerala.

Oil extracted by burning a coconut shell in a copper vessel is used as a specific medicine to cure ringworm, eczema, etc. It is daily applied over the affected part for a fortnight.

Burnt shell-powder mixed with salt and pepper is an excellent dentifrice. A teaspoonful of the fine powder taken immediately after meal with butter milk, acts as a remedy for fermentive dyspepsia and stops the excessive formation of gas, cures diarrhoea, dysentery and antidotes the poisonous effects of corrosive poisons.

Coconut Toddy

The juice drawn from the upper part of the trunk of the tree by incising a hole in it and the liquid is collected in a earthen vessel. It is fermented and known as coconut toddy. It contains about 5 to 8 per cent of alcohol and some B-complex factor with yeast and sugar. Like other alcoholic beverages, it causes intoxication if drunk in excess. It is a very effective digestive enzyme-tonic and causes excessive secretion of the urine, dissolves urinary gravel and flushes the kidney from harmful uric acid. The toddy mixed with rice flour and boiled to make the paste is applied over the chronic foul smelling ulcers which refuse to heal and have the tendency to become gangrenous.

The unfermented juice is an effective diuretic-tonic for acute gonorrhoea, cystitis, pyelitis, nephritis, scanty urination, congestive heart failure, loss of weight, tuberculosis, indigestion, constipation etc. The freshly drawn juice should be used before the sunrise with sugarcandy in the empty stomach; otherwise, it begins to ferment and becomes toddy.

Leaves

Ash of the dry leaves mixed with coconut oil is a very soothing dressing for all kinds of burns and scalds, but care must be taken to prevent the wounds from sepsis in all injuries however minor they are.

Stem

Ash of the stem bark contains cleansing minerals and is used as a dentifrice. It stops the bleeding from the gums, cleans the teeth, prevents the bad breath and protects the enamel of the teeth. The gauze like covering of the stem can be used as a dressing gauze after boiling it in the water or disinfecting it in Dettol. It araetes the wounds and helps to heal them quickly.

Roots

Decoction of the roots is gargled in toothache. It strengthens the gums and loose teeth.

Sleeping under the coconut tree is said to prevent tuberculosis hysteria, insomnia and mental tension.


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