Selected Formulary Book on Inks, Paints, Lacquers, Varnishes and Enamels


Selected Formulary Book on Inks, Paints, Lacquers, Varnishes and Enamels

Author: NPCS Board of Consultants & Engineers
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9788190439855
Code: NI192
Pages: 568
Price: Rs. 1,475.00   US$ 150.00

Published: 2007
Publisher: NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES
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A formula is an entity constructed using the symbols and formation rules of a given logical language. In science, a specific formula is a concise way of expressing information symbolically as in a mathematical or chemical formula. Formulation is a key process in the overall life cycle so that products are delivered that is of the right quality, at a competitive cost, and is made available within the specified time scale. The chemical formula identifies each constituent element by its chemical symbol and indicates the number of atoms of each element found in each discrete molecule of that compound. If a molecule contains more than one atom of a particular element, this quantity is indicated using a subscript after the chemical symbol and also can be combined by more chemical elements. It is all in the formula, whose implications also remain undiscovered by modern economists. It plays a major role in every process whether it is manufacturing process or preservation. There is a big importance of formula in our life because formulas and equations deal with everyday things like shapes, investments, mixing things, movement, lighting, travel and a host of other things they provide information you can use in planning activities.
This book basically deals with inks and marking inks, inks for stamp pads, inks for hand stamps, color stamps for rough paper, indelible hand stamp ink, white stamping ink for embroidery, stencil inks, blue stencil inks, indelible stencil inks, sympathetic inks, typewriter ribbon inks,
coloring agents, writing inks, how to decorate furniture, novelties, furniture lacquer enamels, white lacquer enamel, egg shell white enamel, high gloss while enamel, colors for furniture spraying, furniture lacquer formulas., enamels and industrial varnishes, general purposes varnish, spar and boat varnish, exterior varnish, varnish for outside work, spar and yacht varnish, quick drying interior varnish, crystal varnish (indoor), hard varnish for floors, colored linseed oil floor dressing, wrinkle finish varnish, brewers pitch and keg varnishes, undercoat varnish, quick drying varnish mastic varnish etc.
This book present several hundred advanced product formulations for household, industrial and other applications. This book will be of help to development chemists looking for leads in the formulation of a wide range of products.

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1. INKS AND MARKING INKS
Inks
Blueprint Inks
Drawing Inks
Glass, Celluloid and Metal Inks
Gold Ink
Horticultural Ink
Indelible Inks
India, China, or Japan Ink
Ink Powders and Lozenges
Lithographic Inks
Marking Or Labeling Inks
Colored Marking Inks
Printing Inks.
Inks For Stamp Pads
Inks For Hand Stamps
Color Stamps For Rough Paper
Indelible Hand-Stamp Ink
White Stamping Ink For Embroidery
Stencil Inks
Blue Stencil Inks
Indelible Stencil Inks
Sympathetic Inks
Typewriter Ribbon Inks.
Coloring Agents:,
Writing Inks.
Copying Ink
Ink—Luminous:
Inlaying By Electrolysis
Ink, Carbon Paper
Hectograph Ink
Hectograph Paste
Safety Ink
Green Ink
Finger-printing Ink
Shading Ink
Red Ink (Eosin Type)
‘’ Emergency’’ Red Ink
Blue Ink, Acid-proof
Blue-black Writing Ink
Magoffin’s Black Ink
Scoville’s Black Ink
Quick-drying (Writing) Ink
Permanent Quick-drying Writing Ink
Printing Composition
Printing Ink Varnishes
Marking Porcelain And Glassware
Ceramic Ink For Marking Glass and Porcelain
Ceramic Inks For Porcelain
Ceramic Ink
Ink For Writing On Glass, Tin Etc.
Quick-setting Printing Ink
Print On Wax Or Glassine Paper Bags
Textile Printing Ink
Ink For Marking Fabrics
Kayser’s Marking Paste For Fabrics
Silk Screen-printing
Imitation Engraved Printing
Lithographic Ink
Soap Proof Laundry Black Ink
Ink For Printing On Wet Lumber
Intaglio Printing Ink
Copper-plate Ink Varnish
Rotogravure Ink Varnish
Pale-colored Intaglio Ink,
Base Ink,
Brown Ink From Above Base Ink
Indelible Transfer Ink
Transfer Composition
Mimeograph Ink
Engraver’s Black Stenciling Ink
Stencil Paper
Stencil Sheet
Inks, Writing Ink
Non-corrosive Ink
Gloss Ink
Fountain-pen Ink
Ink Base For Fountain Pens
Ink From Ink Base
Stamp Pad Ink
Recording Inks
Indelible Ink For Documents
Permanent Green Ink
Acid-proof Black Ink
Marking Ink For Shipping Packages
Marking Ink (Alkali And Acid Resistant)
Ink Powder
Concentrated Ink Tablets
Invisible Inks
Transparent Writing Ink Drawing Ink
Solid Stencil Inks
Show Card Inks (Solution Bases)
Oil Stamp Colors
Stamping Inks
Stamp Ink For Eggs
Meat Stamping Ink
Ink To Mark Linen (Black)
Laundry Indelible Ink
Indelible Ink For The Marking of Laundry
Fabric Marking Paste
Textile Marking Crayon (Washable)
Ink For Writing On Photographs
White Ink
Ink For Writing on Celluloid
Cattle Marking Crayons
Sheep Marking Ink
Stamp Ink For Backside of Leather Black
Waterproof Stamp Inks For Backside of Leathers
Ink For Rubber
Stamp Ink For Rubber and Rubber Shoes
Ink For Stamping On Rubber Balloons
Marking Of Uncured Rubber Mixes
Glass Marking Ink
Ink For Glass
Inks For Glass and Porcelain
Permanent Marking of Glass and Porcelain Vessels
Ink For Ceramics
Ink For Brass
Ink For Zinc or Galvanized Iron
Ink To Write on Iron or Steel
Marking Steel
Crayon For Marking Hot Metal
Carbon Printing Colors
White Printing Ink
Black Printing Ink
Printing Ink for Glassine Paper
Preventing Offset in Printing
Offset Printing Ink
Printing Offset Compound
Offset Printing Ink Thinner
Reducer For Printing Ink
Extra Slow Drying
Slow Drying
Reducer For Black Printing Ink
Reducing Inks Used With Rubber Rollers
Deodorizing Printing Ink
Newspaper Picture Transfer Fluid
Transferring Colored Newspaper Pictures
Lithographic Plate Resist
Moistening Fluid For Mimeograph Rolls
“Make-ready” For Relief Printing
Mercury Printing Plate Treatment
Printers’ “Make-ready” Composition
Printers’ Roller Composition
Printers’ Rollers
Recovery of Glycerin From Printers’ Rollers
Rejuvenating Typewriter Rollers
Multigraph Inks
Ink For Hectographs
Heliograph Printing Ink
Kymograph Ink
Dispersing Oil For Pigment Inks
Ink For Line-drawing Machines
Watermark Mixture
Carbon Duplicating Papers (Black)
Copying Paper
Impregnation or Coatings For Carbon Papers, Typewriter Ribbons, Etc
Typewriter Ribbon Ink
Typewriter Ribbon, Reviving
Color For “Blue Transfers”
Transfer-ink
Stencil Sheets
Duplicator Stencil Moistening Fluid
Duplicating Machine Stencils
Tracing Cloth
Ink For Tattooing Chickens
Temperature Indicating Inks
Hectograph Composition
Indelible Copying Leads
Non-offset Compound
Ink: Copying and Record
Ink: Writing
Writing Ink
Duplicating Ink
Stencil Ink
Typewriter Ribbon Ink
Stamp Pad Ink
White India Ink
Water Soluble Aniline Ink
Quick-drying, Non-penetrating Inks
Multigraph Inks
Photomechanical Inks
Autographic Transfer Ink
Tusche
Benday Ink
Developing Inks
Photolitho Transfer Ink
Etching Inks
Hard Etching Ink
Soft Etching Ink
Finishing Ink
Rolling Up Ink
Photogravure Inks
Red Intaglio Printing Ink
Brown Intaglio Printing Ink
Textile Priting Ink
Fabric Marking Ink
Finger Print Ink
Ink For Printing on Wet Lumber
Celluloid Ink
Ink For Cellulose Acetate
Permanent Glass Marking Ink
Glass Etching Ink
Matt Etching Powder For Glass
Ink For Porcelain
Invisible Ink
Burnishing Ink
Ink Eraser
Removing Ink Spots
Leather, Skins, Furs
Detergent For Hide Hair
Persian Leather Chrome Liquors
Stripping Persian Leather
Writing Ink—Red
Writing Ink— Blue Black
Red Writing Ink
Blue Writing Ink
Jet Black Writing Ink
Directions
Concentrated Ink, Powder and Tablets
Ink: Red
Hectograph Ink
Stamp-pad Ink
Recording Inks
Indelible Marking Ink
Blue-print Ink
Ink For Brass
Printing Ink For Cellulose Acetate Film
Ink, Concentrated Writing
Ink, Gold Bronze,
Writing And Copying Ink
Ink For Glass and Procelain
Ink For Writing On Glass
Waterproof Ink For Glass
Ink, Graining
Hectograph Ink
Hectograph Mass
Ink, Indelible
Intaglio Ink
Printing Inks
Typographic Inks
News Inks
Lithographic Inks
Rotographic Inks
Printing Inks
Yellow Pigments
Chrome Yellows
Invisible Ink
Ink, Invisible
Laundry Marking Ink.
Indelible Laundry Ink
Marking Ink
Marking Ink, Waterproof
Acid Proof Marking For Quartz Thermometers
Marking Ink
Blue Marking Ink
Ink, Meat Branding
Meat Stamping Inks
Inks For Metals
Mimeograph Ink Base
Mimeograph Ink
Ink, Mimeograph
Outdoor Ink
Ink, Recording Instrument
Rubber Stamp Ink
Black Stencil Ink
Ink For Use on Metals
Typewriter Ribbon Ink
Stamp Pad Ink
Ink, Sheep Marking
Sausage Marking Ink
Stamping Ink
Ink, Stencil
Ink, Sympathetic
Ink, Invisible or Sympathetic
Transfer Ink
Waterproof Drawing Inks
Dye Toners For Printing Inks
Ink Eradicator For Tracing Cloth
Ink For Zinc
Blue Copying Pencil
Anilinle Blue (Water Soluble)
Colored Pencil Leads
Red Indelible Lead
Stencil Sheet
Stencil Sheet Coating
Stencil Paper
Preserving Vegetables And Fish
Preventing Mold On Stored Meats
Inks And Marking Compounds
Ink for Documents
Non-Corrosive Writing Ink
Powdered Writing Inks
Indelible Inks
Ink for Writing on Celluloid
Black India Ink
Non-Coagulating India Ink
Silver Glow Ink
Marking Ink for Chemical Porcelain
Ink Erasing Fluid
Ink for Glass or Polished Metal
Ink for Glass
Stencil and Marking Ink
Ink for Writing on Carbon Paper
Carbon Paper Ink
Transfer Ink
Thermographic Printing Ink
Rotogravure Ink
Offset Printing Ink
Intaglio Printing Ink
Lithographic Bronze Printing Ink Varnish
Printing Lacquer
Solid Color for Rubber Printing Blocks
Ink for Rotary Press
Typographic Ink for Newspapers
Newspaper Ink
Proxylin Printing Ink
Typographic Ink
Water-Soluble Printing Ink
Lithographic Color Ink
Lithographic Ink for Reproductions
Fusible Lithographic Ink
Fine Lithographic Ink
Typographic Ink for Prints
Lithographic Inks with Oil-Varnishes Thickened by a Resin
Varnish for Lithographic Inks
Varnish for Artistic Prints Medium Strength
Medium Varnish (for Inks)
Evanescent (Invisible) Inks
Billiard Chalk
Cellulose Transfer Inks.
Emulsifiable Transfer Ink
Ink Remover
Non-inflammable Ink Remover
Printing Form Cleaner
Printing Roller Cleaner
General Printing Cleaner
Intaglio Printing Press Cleaner
Off-Set Printing Cleaner
Ink Remover
Ink Eradicator
Stencil Coating Paste
Calcium Oleate Solution
Ammonium Oleate Solution
While Stencil Paste
Black Stencil Paste
Red Stencil Paste
Resin
2. PAINTS, LACQUERS, VARNISHES ENAMELS
Kalsomine
Sizing Walls for Kalsomine
Lacquers
Instructions For Making Lacquers
Brushing Lacquer Formulas
Clear Lacquer
Yellow Brushing Lacquer
White Lacquer Brushing
Black Brushing Lacquer
Red Brushing Lacquer
Blue Brushing Lacquer
Brown Brushing Lacquer
Green Brushing Lacquer

Thinner Formula For Brushing Lacquer
How to Decorate Furniture Novelties
Furniture Lacquer Enamels
White Lacquer Enamel
Egg Shell White Enamel
High Gloss While Enamel
Colors for Furniture Spraying
Furniture Lacquer Formulas.
Universal Thinners.
Cold Paints, Bronzing Liquids.
Lacquer Formulations
Involving the Use of Glyceryl
Phthalate Synthetic Resin
Chlorinated Diphenyl Lacquer
Phenolic Resin Solution Lacquer
Vinyl Compounds Lacquers
Dibutyl Phthalate (% of resin content)
Cellulose Acetate Lacquer
Baking Enamels
Polymerized Acrylic Compounds
Benzyl and Ethyl Cellulose
Lacquer Solvents
Lacquer Plasticizers
Ceramic Insulation Binder
Transparent Siliceous Materials
Acid Resisting Frit
Coating Incandescent Globes Green
Glazes Without Lead for Terra Cotta
Glazed Pottery, Tiles, Etc.
Ceramic Glaze Maturing Below ° C.
Refractory Articles
Refractories
Modeling Clay
Refractory Paint for Firebrick
Dyes for Coloring Clay Slips or Glazes
Black Paint for Marking Refractories
Enameling Composition
Enameling or Glazing Metals
Production of Enameled Iron
Articles
Disinfectant “Paint”
Roof Paint
(Black) Roof Coating
“Silver” Roof Paint
Painting Over Dark-Stained Shingles
Painting Stained Shingles
Wood Preservation Paint Primer
Acid and Water Resistant Coating for Table Tops
Refinishing Damaged Table Top
Filler for Fine Cracks Before Painting
Painting Pine Log Cabin
Paints for Cedar, Cypress and Redwood
Barn Paint
Barrel Paints
Orange Vinsol Barrel Paint
Red Vinsol Barrel Paint
Black Vinsol Barrel Paint
Alcohol Resistant Bar Finishing
Coating for Butter Tubs
Glue Paints
Protective Paint for Stone Surfaces
Artificial Wall Stone Coating
Blackboard Slating Paint
Finishes for Slate
Imitation Marble
Aluminum Paint
Aluminum Printing for wood
Steel Paint
Metal Coating for Paper and Fabrics
Auto Top Dressing
Coating Inside of Latex Drums
Ink Resistant Fountain Pen Barrel
Dental Model Coating
Quick Drying Temporary Protective
Coating
Fireproof Paint
Fireproofing Coating
Non-inflammable Paint
Peelable Adhesive Protective Coating
Filler, Marking and Coating
Composition
Cellulose Acetate Cloth Coatings
Sound Insulating Coating
Electrical Insulating Tape Coating
Battery Terminal Coating Compound
Corrosion Proof Cable Coating
Ozone Resistant Cable Coating
Protecting Underground Pipes
Graphite Paints
Acid Resisting Paint
Paint for Chemical Laboratories
Matrix Coating Composition
Coating for Candles
Paint Drier
Stabilized Paint Drier
Cobalt Drier
Silk Screen Stencil Filler
Paint Filler
Furniture Filler
Clear Primer for Polished Surfaces
Zinc White-Paste for Paints
Chrome Green Pigment
Lead Chromate Pigment
Dispersible Carbon Black
Barium Carbonate from Heavy Spar
Lake Colors
Luminous Paints, Pigments
Light from an Argon Bulb
Water Varnish
Staining Gut Leaders for Fishing
Varnish for Flies, Etc.
Brick Coating Varnish
Varnishes For Paper
Poster Varnish
Cellulose Varnish
Transparent Paper Varnish
Paper Varnishes
Varnishing Wall Paper
Wall Primer Varnish
Varnish for Rubber
“Anchoring” Varnish to Rubber
Tar Oil Varnishes
Soybean Oil Varnishes
Medium Long Oil Varnish Without
China Wood Oil
Oiticica Stand Oils and Varnishes
Stand Oil
Pure Stand Oil
Stand Oil from Oiticica and Linseed Oils
Enamels and Industrial Varnishes
General Purposes Varnish
Spar and Boat Varnish
Exterior Varnish
Varnish for Outside Work
Spar and Yacht Varnish
Quick-Drying Interior Varnish
Crystal Varnish (Indoor)
Hard Varnish for Floors
Colored Linseed Oil Floor Dressing
Wrinkle Finish Varnish
Brewer’s Pitch and Keg Varnishes
Undercoat Varnish
Quick Drying Varnish
Mastic Varnish
Spirit Finish
“EL” Varnish
Glossy Machine Paints and Varnishes
Gasoline Pump Enamel Varnish
Vinsol Pump Enamel Varnish
Stove-Pipe Varnish
Tough Varnish
Furniture Dye (Stain)
Dark Smoky Brown
Shingle Stains
Flat Lacquer
Clear Lacquer
Clear Furniture Lacquer Base
Wood Lacquer
Lacquer for Wooden. Floors
Floor Polish (Lacquer)
Inside Gloss White Lacquer
Typical Cellulose (Nitro.) Lacquer
Oil Resisting Lacquer
Durable Brushing Lacquer
Ski Lacquer (to Use as Base for Waxes)
Ski Lacqeur
Wax “Lacquer”
“Lacquer” for Furniture, Shellac
Gelva Outside Lacquers
Luminous Outdoor Lacquer
Luminous Lacquer Coating
Crystallizing Lacquer
Clear Auto Lacquer Base
Black Automobile Lacquer
Aluminum Lacquer for Automobile Cylinders
Black Lacquer for Steering Wheels
Clear Metal Lacquer Base
Treatment for Adhering Lacquer to   Chromium Plate
Beer Can Lacquer
Stove Lacquer
Asphaltum Lacquer for Iron
Shellac Lacquers for Tin Foils
Metal Foil Lacquer
Insulating Cable Lacquer
Insulating Lacquer
Rubber Lacquer
Rubbing Clear Lacquer
Latex Dope
Rubber Lacquer
Gloss Rubber Coating Lacquer
Electric Cable Lacquer
Lacquer for Shoe Tips
Suede Finish Lacquer
Cloth Coating Lacquer
“Lacquer” for Glassine Paper
Gloss Paper Coating Lacquer
Bottle Lacquer
Lacquer for Putty
Stencil Correcting-Lacquer
Correcting Lacquer for Multigraph Stencil
Black-Board “Lacquer”
Sealing Lacquer
Black Lacquer
Cheap Black Lacquer
Bronze Lacquer
Bronzing Lacquer, Non-Gelling
Marbleizing Lacquer
Dull Finish Lacquer
Colored Master Batch for Lacquers
Colored Lacquer Chips
Lacquer Finish Rejuvenator
Undercoat for Lacquer
Dental Model Lacquer
Confectionery Lacquer (Glaze)
Lacquers for Chocolate (Glazes)
“Lacquer” for Washable Wall Papers
Lacquering Cardboard for Chair and Floor Coverings
Cumarone Base Lacquers
Cumarone Lacquer Base
Cellulose Acetate Coatings
Spraying” and-Dipping Lacquers
Leather Coating
Wire Coating
Cloth Coating
Hercose C Coatings
Clear Metal Lacquers
Clear Lacquer
Lacquers for Special Metals
Cork Tile Lacquers
Low Flammability
Bronzing Liquids
Sealer Between Coats
Textile and Paper Lacquers
Airplane Lacquer (Dope)
Airplane Fabric “Dopes”
Color Coat Lacquer
Lacquer Primer
Nitrocellulose Solvents
Solvent for Vinyl Lacquers
Thinners for Vinyl Acetate
Resins (Gelva)
For Spraying Lacquers
For Brushing Lacquers
Barrel Sealing Compound
Sealer for Asphalt Emulsion Coated Walls
Seal for Gasoline, Oil and Water Pipes
Quick Seal for Radiators (External)
Sanding Sealer
Hat Stiffeners, Water Soluble
Hat Sizings or Stiffeners
Low Priced Waterproof Hat Stiffener
Cheap Dope Hat Sizings
Hat Finishing
Wall Glaze
Stone Sizing Material
Size for Lettering on Galvanized Iron
Gold Size
Applying Gold Leaf on Molding
Liquid Varnish Remover
Varnish and Lacquer Remover
Rubber, Oil Paints
Liquids
Pastes
Paint Remover
Paint and Lacquer Removers Non-inflammable
Removers for Cellulose and “Spirit” Lacquers
Removers for Chlorinated Rubber
Oil Cellulose and “Spirit”
Lacquers and Paints
Removers for Lacquers and Paints
Paint Removers (for Oil Paints)
Removers for Oil, Rubber, Cellulose Lacquers or Paints
Miscellaneous Paint Removers
Paint and Varnish Remover
Care of Brushes
Cleaning Paint Brushes
Paint Brush Cleaner
Paint Deodorizer
Rust Preventing Mixture
Waterproofing Composition
Waterproofing Compound
Waterproofing Adhesive Composition
Transparent, Flexible, Moisture-Proofing
Waterproofing for Casein Finish
Fireproof and Waterproof Coating Composition
Insoluble Albumen Coatings
Moisture Proof Coating for “Cellophane”
Moisture Proofing for “Cellophane”
Waterproof Casein Coating
Waterproof Gelatin Coating
Making a Surface Non-Wettable by Mineral Oil
Waterproof Insulation for Textiles, Paper, Etc.
Translucent Waterproofing for Paper and Leather
Resurfacing and Waterproofing for Roofs
Moisture Proof Coating for Wood
Waterproofing Brick Walls with Paint
Paints, Enamels, Varnishes Lacquers
White Traffic Paint
Yellow Traffic Paint
Light Yellow Traffic Paint
Medium Yellow Traffic Paint
Orange Traffic Paint
Asbestos Shingle Paint
Priming Coat
Second Coat
Third Coat—Flat Finish
Third Coat—Gloss Finish
How to Paint Asbestos Shingle
Water-Paint Binder
Distemper Paint From Oil Seed Waste
Waterproof Floor Coating
Water Resistant Zein Composition
Bituminous Coating for Road Rock
Black Tire Finish
Finish for Synthetic Rubber
Water Shellac, Concentrated Fluid
Shellac, Water Soluble
Improving Gloss of Shellac Films
Soluble Rosin
Fire Retardant Paint
Heat Resistant Metallic Paint
Non-Inflammable Airplane Paint
Waterproof Paint
Wash Proof Paint
Washable Wall Coating
Sound Insulating Paint
Paint for Bituminous Articles
Anti-Corrosive Ship Bottom Paint
Stove Paint
Dulling Gloss of Painted Walls
Re-Polishing Gloss Paint
Gasoline Storage Tank Paints Primers
Oil Paints
Two-Coat Exterior Paint System
Waterproof Window Lettering Paint
Weather Resisting Paint
Window Glass Paint
Air-Raid Black Out
Aluminum Paint
Non-Gelling Aluminum Paint
Chlorinated Rubber Paint
Superior Acid and Alkali Resisting Paint (N.B.)
Starch Wall Paint (Protective)
Fluorescent Paints
Tungstate Fluorescent Salts
Phosphorescent Zinc Sulphide
Luminous Paints
Luminous Pigment Paints
Luminous Moldings
Luminous Stones
Luminous Pigment Paints
Plasticizers for Luminous Paints
Vehicles for Luminous Paints
Luminescent Coating for Mercury Vapor Lamps
Conductive Coating for Electron Discharge Devices
Fluorescent Liquids
Phosphorescent Material
Fluorescent Material
Fluorescent Screen
X-Ray Shielding Compound
High Gloss Dammar-Alkyd Architectural White Enamels
Low-Cost White Enamels
Bobbin Enamel
Quick Drying Red Oxide Enamel   Chlorinated Rubber
Alkali Resisting Black Enamel
Enamelling of Iron
Porcelain Enamel Patching
Use and Care of Paint Brushes
Varnishes
Bakelite-Linseed Oil
Bakelite-Soybean Oil
Ester Gum-Linseed Oil
Ester Gum-Soybean Oil
Bakelite-Soybean Oil
Bakelite-Tung-Oil
Bakelite-Linseed Oil
Ester Gum-Tung Oil
Ester Gum-Soybean Oil
Staining Wood for Piano Keys
Fumed Wood Finish
Marbelizing Wood
Wood Primer
Non-Grain Raising Wood Stain
Wood Preservative & Stain
Light Fast Pigment Stain
White Pickled Finish on Birch Wood
Black Stain for Wood Laboratory Desk Tops
Fluorescent Lamp Coating
Fluorescent X-Ray Screen
Ethyl Cellulose Lacquer
Ethyl Cellulose Solvent
Jet Block Lacquer
Medium Jet Black Lacquer
Second Black Lacquer
Lacquer for Sheet Metal Objects
Wood Lacquer Easy Rubbing
Lacquer for Zinc
Wood Lacquer-Check Resisting
Durable, Polished Metal Lacquer
Coating Lacquer-Slow Burning
Hot Melt Paper Lacquer
Lacquer, Esterified Copal
Sanding Sealer Lacquer
Nitrocellulose Lacquer Emulsion
Lacquers for Hot Application
Hot Lacquer Formula Base
Hot Lacquer Thinners
Clear Lacquer, Outside
Automobile Enamel Lacquer
Perspiration Resistant Lacquer
Transparent Waterproof Coating
Lacquer for Glass Fabric
Anti-Shattering Lacquer for Glass Windows
Moisture-Vapor-Proof Lacquers for Paper
Book cover Coating
Straw Hat Coating
Ski Coating
Flexible, Flame-Proof Electrical Insulation
Oilproof Material
Window Shade Filling
Non-Offset Printing Spray
Lacquer Thinner Blends
Non-Chalking Pigments
Mineral Violet Pigment
Molybdenum Orange Pigment
Luminous Pigments
Alkaline Earth Sulphide Type
Luminous Pigments
Technical Batches
Luminous Pigments From Zinc Sulphide
Precipitation of Zinc Sulphide
Zinc Sulphide Pigment
Technical Procedure for Zinc Sulphide
Mixture of Flux and Activating Metal Salt
Lacquers, Paints, Varnishes, Stains
Cotton Solution
Clear Lacquers
Wood Lacquers
Flat Lacquer
Rubbing or Polishing Lacquer
Alcohol Proof Lacquers
Wood Enamels (Pyroxylin)
Metal Lacquers
Automobile Lacquers
Leather Lacquers
Bronzing Lacquer
Specialty Lacquers
Nail Polish Lacquer (Clear)
Olive Green Dipping Enamel
Anti-fouling Lacquer
Lacquer Black Coating
Lacquer Coating, Non-inflammable
Non-Blushing Lacquers
Pearl Wood Lacquer
White Lacquer Enamels
Nitrocellulose Lacquers
Lacquer, Shellac Ester
Lacquer Thinners
Undercoat, Lacquer
Imitation Chinese Lacquer
Non-Gelling Lacquers
Non-Gelling Metallic Lacquers
Artificial Flower Pearl Lacquer
Pearl Dipping Solution
Pearl Enamels
Non-Chalking Lacquer Coating
Lacquer Pigment Base
Pyroxylin and Rubber Lacquer
Lacquer, Quick Drying
Paper Lacquer
“Pearl” Lacquer
Bronze Lacquer, Non-Thickening
Crackle Lacquer Base
Crystallizing Lacquer
Tinting Lacquers, Shellacs, Etc.
Air-Plane Wing Dope
Addition of Pigments
Airship Fabric Dope
Air Plane Dope
Anti-fouling Composition
Paints
Paste Paints
Zinc Oxide
Red Lead
White Lead
Interior Paints
Wall Wash for Neutralizing Free Lime on Fresh Walls
Quick Drying Enamels
Varnishes
Gloss Oil
50 gal. Rosin Varnish
25 gal. Rosin. Varnish
50 Gal. ester Varnish
Ester Cut
4 Hour Varnish (Partial Phenol-formaldehyde)
Type of Resin
40 gal. Phenol-formaldehyde Type of Gum
25 Gal Ester Varnish
Dammar Cut
Interior Enamel
Interior Flat Paint
Interior Gloss Paint
Exterior House Paint
Black Stoving Enamels or Baking Japans
Air Drying Black Enamels and Varnishes
Wood Paints
Flat Lacquer Paste
Clear Gloss Lacquer
Priming Coat
Second Coat (New Outside Wood)
Third Coat (New Outside Wood)
First Coat (Repainting Outside Wood)
Second Coat (Repainting Outside Wood)
Priming Coat (Soft Wood Floors)
Priming Coat (Hard Wood Floors)
Second Coat (Wood Floors)
Third Coat (Wood Floors)
Underside Porch Floors
Fairly Permanent
Interior Wall Paints
Interior Wood Painting
Priming Coat (Interior Plaster)
Second Coat (Interior Plaster)
Third Coat, Flat, Finish (Interior Plaster
Third Coat, Eggshell Finish (Interior Plaster)
Third Coat, Oil Gloss Finish (Interior Plaster)
Plastic Paint
Priming Coat (New Inside Wood)
Second Coat (New Inside Wood)
Third Coat, Flat Finish (New Inside Wood)
Third Coat, Eggshell Finish
Third Coat, Oil Gloss Finish
First Coat Over Shellac
Interior Wood Stains
Stain Formulas
Painting Stucco, Concrete, Brick Etc.
Priming Coat (Stucco, Concrete, Brick, Stone)
Second Coat (Stucco, Concrete, Brick, Stone)
Third Coat, Gloss Finish (Stucco, Concrete, Brick, Stone)
Third Coat, Flat Finish (Stucco, Concrete, Brick, Stone)
Second Coat (Concrete Floors)
Third Coat (Concrete Floors)
Metal Painting
Priming Coat (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Second Coat (Light Brown) (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Third Coat (Dark Brown) (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Third Coat (Light Green) (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Third Coat (Dark Green) (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Third Coat (Black) (Exterior and Interior Metal)
Second Coat (Exterior Metal)
Third Coat (Exterior Metal)
Third Coat (Light Gray) (Exterior Metal)
Priming Coat (Interior Metal)
Second Coat (Interior Metal)
Third Coat, Flat Finish (Interior Metal)
Third, Eggshell Gloss. Finish (Interior Metal)
Priming Coat (Galvanized Iron)
Second Coat (Galvanized Iron)
Third Coat (Galvanized Iron)
Boat Painting
Priming Coat (Boat Exterior)
Second Coat (Boat Exterior)
Finishing Coat (Boat Exterior)
Gloss Finishing Coat (Boat Exterior)
Priming Coat (Boat Interior)
Second Coat (Boat Interior)
Finishing Coat, Eggshell Gloss (Boat Interior)
Metal Work on Boats
Row Boats—Exterior and Interior
Canoes
White Enamel Paint, Outdoor
Decorators' Varnish
Long Oil Outdoor Varnish
Flatting Varnish
White Tin-printing Enamel
White Enamel Paint Indoor
White Enamel Paint, Tin Printing
Decorator’s Varnish
Quick-drying Outdoor Varnish by the American Method
Water Paints
Silicate Water Paint
Fireproof Paint
Water Paint
Water Soluble Shellac Solution
Matt Finish Distemper
Oil-bound Distemper
Water Paint
Paint, Oil Emulsion
Railroad Water Tank Paint
Paint for Interior Plaster
Black Walnut Stain
Ebony Stain
Clear Shingle Stain
Colored Shingle Stain (Red)
Grind and add
Mahogany Stain
Traffic or Road Marking Paint
Vehicle for Ready Mixed Aluminum Paint
Vehicles for Aluminum and Bronzing Liquids
Vehicle for Outside Aluminum Paints
Vehicle for Interio-Aluminum Paints
Wall Sealers
Glazing Composition
Candy Glaze
Acid Resistant Paint
Antifouling Paint
Paint, Automobile Top
Auto Top Dressing
Blackboard Paint
Bridge Paint
Paint, Cement
Cement Water Paint
Cold Water Paint, Outside
Enamel Paint Remover
Enamel Paint (Outdoor)
Flexible Paint for Marking or Stencil Work
Freight Car Paint
Galvanized Iron, Treatment before Painting
Paint Grinding
Heat Resisting Paint
High Light Reflecting Paint
Priming Coat
Second Coat
Third Coat
Paint, Hydrocarbon Resistant
Paint, Iron Protective
Latex Paints
Heat Sensitive Paints
Luminous Paints
Marine Paint
Marine Paint
Paint, Oil Emulsion
Olive Drab Paint
Outside White Paint Base
Paint, Outside
Outside White Paint
Cheap Outside White Paint
Fresh Plaster, Painting On
Paint, Cold Water
New Plaster Wall Size
Varnish Formula No. LV-112
Rubbing Varnish
Varnish
Varnish Formula No. LV-89
Varnish Formula No. LV-93
Varnish Formula No. LV-107
Varnish Formula No. LV-111
Ester Gum Mixing Varnish (L.V.-151)
LV-150 Oil
White Enamel
Drier
White Enamel
Varnish
White Enamel
Varnish Formula No. LV-66
Four Hour Varnish
Medium Oil Varnish
Procedure
Remarks
Cobalt Drier
Manganese Drier
Short Oil Varnish
Procedure
Remarks
Medium Oil Varnish
Procedure
Remarks
Four Hour Varnish
Procedure
Remarks
Concrete Silos, Varnish for Interior of
Alkali Resisting Varnish
Varnish, Medium Oil-China Wood Oil
Long Oil—China Wood—Linseed—Rosin Type
Long Oil—China Wood Oil—Cumar Spar Type with Litharge
Long Oil—China Wood—Spar with Rosin and Litharge (Regular 34 gallon type)
Long Oil—China Wood Oil—Spar with a Resinate (25 gallon Quick Drying)
Short Oil—China Wood Oil Alone
Short Oil—China Wood Oil with a Holding Agent
Medium Oil—China Wood—Linseed Oil (Low Cooking Temperature)
75-Gallon Rosin Varnish Formula
25-Gallon Ester Gum Varnish Formula
50-Gallon Ester Gum Varnish Formula
75-Gallon Ester Gum Varnish Formula
25-Gallon Amberol F-7 Varnish Formula
50-Gallon Amberol F-7 Varnish Formula
75-Gallon Amberol F-7 Varnish Formula
25-Gallon Amberol 226 Varnish Formula
50-Gallon Amberol 226 Varnish Formula
75-Gallon Amberol 226 Varnish Formula
25-Gallon XR-254 Bakelite Varnish Formula
50-Gallon XR-254 Bakelite Varnish Formula
75-Gallon XR-224 Bakelite Varnish Formula
XK-944 Lead Manganese Drier
Varnish Formula
Baking Varnish for Wrinkle-Finish on Metal
Light Fast Colored Varnish
Bookbinder’s Varnish
Anti-Rust Varnish
Varnish, Anti-Skinning Agent for
Amberol Varnish
Bakelite Varnish
Bottle Varnish
Bakelite Type Varnish
Bakelite-Nevindene-Ester Gum
Bakelite-Nevindene Varnish for Maximum Adhesion
Bakelite-Nevindene Floor Varnish
Typical Blended Oil Esterified Rosin Mixing Varnish
Typical Example of an Enamel Varnish, Using Modified Phenol   Formaldehyde Resin
Crystallizing Varnish
Varnish, Electrical Conducting
Varnish Emulsion
Varnish, Flat
Hard Cold Made Varnish
Varnish, Insulating
Insulating Varnish
Orange Shellac Varnish
Quick Drying Rubbing Varnish
Liquid Drier
Quick Drying Floor or Interior Varnish
Quick Drying Spar Varnish
Heavy-Bodied Oil
Typical Resinate Varnish
Rubber Shoe Varnish
Short Oil Varnish (Wood Oil)
Short Oil Varnish (Linseed Oil)
Medium Oil Varnish
Long Oil Varnish (Linseed)
Spar Varnish
Straw Hat Varnish
Transfer Varnish
Violin Varnish
Water Shellac Varnish
Varnish, Water Resistant
Whitewash
Whitewash (Without Glue)
Plastic Paint
Paint, “Raised Surface”
Caking of Crystals, Prevention of
Roof Paint
Paint, Rust Proofing
Structural Steel Paint
Shellac Paint, Metallic
Ship Paint
Paints, Phosphorescent
Paint, Plastic
Paint Base for Textiles
Water Paint
Water Paint for Stucco
Cheap White Paint
Liquid Paint Drier
Wood Paint Primer
25-Gallon Rosin Varnish Formula
50-Gallon Rosin Varnish Formula
Paint and Varnish Remover
Wood Bleaches
Wood, Plastic
Wood Filler Powder
Acid Proof Wood Stain
Wood Stains, Non-Grain Raising
Putty
Preparing Zinc for Painting
Oil Soluble Stain
Synthetic Resin Finishes
Fused Manganese Resinate
Limed Rosin
Phthalic Anhydride Varnish Resin
Waterproof Shellac
Water Solution of Shellac
Laboratory Table Finish
Acid Proof Coating
Bituminous Coating
Butter Tubs, Coating for
Cellulose Coatings
Concrete Coating
Corrosion Resistant Coating
Pipe Coating
Pipe Line, Coating for Petroleum
Protecting Coating for Wax Finishes
Rubber Pyroxylin Coatings
Wall Coating
Wrinkled Finish Coating
Filler for Cast Iron
Filler for Automobile-Body Work
Crack Filler
Milk Bottle Caps
Dispersions of Casein and Shellac
Treating Concrete Oil Tanks
Precipitated Cobalt Linoleate (Drier)
Lead Drier
Nitrocellulose Emulsion
Urea Resin Stoving Finishes
Paint Remover
Varnish for Wax Coated Surface
Wood-Oil Stand-Oil (Thickened Wood-Oil)
Medium Long-Oil Varnish for Inside and Outside Use
Enamel Varnish
Long-Oil Boat Varnish (Yacht Varnish, Marine or Submersible Varnish, Non-Spotting Outside
Varnish)


^ Top

Sample Chapters


(Following is an extract of the content from the book)
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 INKS AND MARKING INKS

INKS

BLUEPRINT INKS.

1.—For red-writing fluids for blueprints, take a piece of

common washing soda the size of an ordinary bean, and dissolve

it in 4 tablespoonfuls of ordinary red-writing ink, to make a red

fluid. To keep it from spreading too much, use a fine pen to

apply it with, and write fast so as not to allow too much

of the fluid to get on the paper, for it will continue eating until it

is dry.

2.—For red and white solutions for writing on blueprints,

dissolve a crystal of oxalate of potash about the size of a pea in an

ink-bottle full of water. This will give white lines on blueprints;

other potash solutions are yellowish. If this shows a tendency to

run, owing to too great strength, add more water and thicken

slightly with mucilage. Mix this with red or any other colored ink

about half and half, and writing may be done on the blueprints

in colors corresponding to the inks used.

3.—Add to a small bottle of water enough washing soda to

make a clear white line, then add enough gum arabic to it to

prevent spreading and making ragged lines. To make red lines dip

the pen in red ink and then add a little of the solution by means of

the quill.

4.— For white ink, grind zinc oxide fine on marble and

incorporate with it a mucilage made with gum tragacanth. Thin a

little for use. Add a little oil of cloves to prevent mold, and shake

from time to time.

5.—A fluid which is as good as any for writing while on

blueprints is made of equal parts of sal soda and water.

6.—Mix equal parts of borax and water.

Both these liquids, 5 and 6 must be used with a size-pointed

peat a pen with a blunt point will not work well.

DRAWING INKS:

Blue Ruling Ink.—Good vitriol, 4 ounces; indigo, 1 ounce.

Pulverize the indigo, add it to the vitriol, and let it stand exposed

to the air for 6 days, or until dissolved; then fill the pots with

chalk, add fresh gall, ½ gill, boiling it before use.

Black Ruling Ink.—Take good black ink, and add gall as

for blue. Do not cork it, as this prevents it from turning

black.

Carbon Ink.—Dissolve real India ink in common black

ink, or add a small quantity of lampblack previously heated

to redness, and ground perfectly smooth, with a small portion

of the ink.

Carmine.—The ordinary solution of carmine in ammonia

water, after a short time in contact with steel, becomes blackish red,

but an ink may be made that will retain its brilliant carmine color

to the last by the following process, given by Dingler: Triturate 1

part of pure carmine with 15 parts of acetate of ammonia solution,

with an equal quantity of distilled water in a porcelain mortar,

and allow the whole to stand for some time. In this way, a portion

of the alumina, w hich is combined with the carmine dye, is taken

up by the acetic acid of the ammonia salt, and separates as a

precipitate, while the pure pigment of the cochineal remains

dissolved in the half-saturated ammonia. It is now filtered and a

few drops of pure white sugar syrup added to thicken it. A solution

of gum arabic cannot be used to thicken it, since the ink still

contains some acetic acid, which would coagulate the bassorine,

one of the constituents of the gum.

Liquid Indelible Drawing Ink.—Dissolve, by boiling, 2 parts

of blond (golden yellow) shellac in l.6 parts, by weight, of sal

ammoniac, 16°, with 10 parts, by weight, of distilled water, and

filter the solution through a woolen cloth. Now dissolve or grind

0.5 parts, by weight, of shellac solution with 0.01 part, by weight, of

carbon black. Also dissolve .03 parts of nigrosin in 0.4 parts of

distilled water and pour both solutions together. The mixture is

allowed to settle for 2 days and the ready ink is drawn off from the

sediment.

GLASS, CELLULOID AND METAL INKS:

Most inks for glass will also write on celluloid and the metals.

The following 1 and 2 are the most widely known recipes:

1.— In 500 parts of water dissolve 36 parts of sodium fluoride

and 7 parts of sodium sulphate. In another vessel dissolve in the

same amount of water 14 parts of zinc chloride and to the solution

add 56 parts of concentrated hydrochloric acid. To use, mix equal

volumes of the two solutions and add a little India ink; or, in the

absence of this, rub up a little lampblack with it. It is scarcely

necessary to say that the mixture should not be put in glass

containers, unless they are well coated internally with paraffine,

wax, gutta-percha, or some similar material. To avoid the

inconvenience of keeping the solutions in separate bottles, mix

them and preserve in a rubber bottle. A quill pen is best to use in

writing with this preparation, but metallic pens may be used, if

quite clean and new.

2. — In 150 parts of alcohol dissolve 20 parts of rosin, and

add to this, drop by drop, stirring continuously, a solution of 35

parts of borax in 250 parts of water. This being accomplished,

dissolve in the solution sufficient methylene blue to give it the

desired tint.

Ink for Writing on Glazed Cardboard.—The following are

especially recommended for use on celluloid:

1. — Dissolve 4 drachms of brown shellac in 4 ounces of

alcohol. Dissolve 7 drachms of borax in 6 ounces of distilled

water. Pour the first solution slowly into the second and carefully

mix them, after which add 12 grains of aniline dye of the desired

color. Violet, blue, green, red, yellow, orange, or black aniline dyes

can be used.

Such inks may be used for writing on bottles, and the glass

may be cleaned with water without the inscription being impaired.

2.Ferric chloride ............................................... 10 parts

Tannin ........................................................... 15 parts

Acetone ........................................................ 100 parts

Dissolve the ferric chloride in a portion of the acetone and the

tannin in the residue, and mix the solutions.

3.—Dissolve a tar dyestuff of the desired color in anhydrous

acetic acid.

GOLD INK.

1.—The best gold ink is made by rubbing up gold leaf as

thoroughly as possible with a little honey. The honey is then

washed away with water, and the finely powdered gold leaf left is

mixed to the consistency of a writing ink with weak gum water.

Everything depends upon the fineness of the gold powder, i.e.,

upon the diligence with which it has been worked with the honey.

Precipitated gold is finer than can be got by any rubbing, but its

color is wrong, being dark brown. The above gold ink should be

used with a quill pen.

2.—An imitation gold or bronze ink is composed by grinding

1,000 parts of powdered bronze of handsome color with a varnish

prepared by boiling together 500 parts of nut oil, 200 parts of

garlic, 500 parts of coconut oil, 100 parts of Naples yellow, and as

much of sienna.

HORTICULTURAL INK.

1.—Chlorate of platinum. 1/4 ounce; soft water, 1 pint.

Dissolve and preserve it in glass. Used with a clean, quill to write

on zinc labels. It almost immediately turns black, and cannot be

removed by washing. The addition of gum and lampblack, as

recommended in certain books, is unnecessary, and even prejudicial

to the quality of the ink.

2.—Verdigris and sal ammoniac, of each ½ ounce; levigated

lampblack, ½ ounce; common vinegar, ¼ pint; mix thoroughly.

Used as the last, for either zinc, iron, or steel.

3—Blue vitriol, 1 ounce; sal ammoniac, ½ ounce (both in

powder); vinegar, ¼ pint; dissolve. A little lamp-black or vermilion

may be added, but it is not necessary. Use No. 1, for iron, tin, or

steel plate.

INDELIBLE INKS.

These are also frequently called water proof, incorrodible, or

indestructible inks. They are employed for writing labels on bottles

containing strong acids and alkaline solutions. They may be

employed with stamps, types or stencil plates, by which greater

neatness will be secured than can be obtained with either a brush

or pen.

The following is a superior preparation for laundry use:

Aniline oil ............................................................. 85 parts

Potassium chlorate................................................. 5 parts

Distilled water ...................................................... 44 parts

Hydrochloric acid, pure

(specific gravity, 1.124) ............................... 68 parts

Copper chloride, pure 6 parts

Mix the aniline oil, potassium chlorate, and 20 parts of the

water and heat in a capacious vessel, on the water bath, at a

temperature of from 175° to 195º F., until the chlorate is entirely

dissolved, then add one-half of the hydrochloric and continue

the heat until the mixture begins to take on a darker color. Dissolve

the copper chloride in the residue of the water, add the remaining

hydrochloric acid to the solution, and add the whole to the liquid

on the water bath, and heat the mixture until it acquires a fine redviolet

color. Pour into a flask with a well-fitting ground-glass stopper,

close tightly and set aside for several days, or until it ceases to

throw down a precipitate. When this is the case, pour off the clear

liquid into smaller (one drachm or a drachm and a half) containers.

This ink must be used with a quill pen, and is especially good

for linen or cotton fabrics, but does not answer so well for silk or

woolen goods. When first used, it appears as a pale red, but on

washing with soap or alkalies, or on exposure to the air, becomes

a deep, dead black. The following is a modification of the foregoing:

Blue Indelible Ink.—This ink has the reputation of resisting

not only water and oil, but alcohol, oxalic acid, alkalies, the

chlorides, etc. It is prepared as follows: Dissolve 4 parts of gum lac

in 36 parts of boiling water carrying 2 parts of borax. Filter and set

aside. Now dissolve 2 parts of gum arabic in 4 parts of water and

add the solution to the filtrate. Finally, after the solution is quite

cold, add 2 parts of powdered indigo and dissolve by agitation. Let

stand for several hours, then decant, and put in small bottles.

PRINTING INKS.

Black printing inks owe their color to finely divided carbon

made from lamp-black, pine-wood, rosin oil, etc., according to the

quality of the ink desired. The finest inks are made from flamelampblack.

There are however, certain requirements made of all

printing inks alike, and these are as follows: The ink must be a

thick and homogeneous liquid, it must contain no solid matter

but finely divided carbon, and every drop when examined

microscopically must appear as a clear liquid containing black

grains uniformly distributed.

The consistency of a printing ink must be such that it

passes on to the printing rollers at the proper rate. It will be

obvious that various consistencies are demanded according to

the nature of the machine used by the printer. For a rotary machine

which prints many thousands of copies an hour a much thinner

ink will be necessary than that required for art printing or for slow

presses. As regards color, ordinary printing ink should be a pure

black. For economy’s sake, however, newspaper printers often use

an ink so diluted that it dors not look deep black, but a grayish

black, especially in large type.

The question of the time that the ink takes to dry on the

paper is a very important one, especially with ink used for printing

newspapers which are folded and piled at one operation. If then

the ink does not dry very quickly, the whole impression smudges

and “sets off” so much that it becomes illegible in places. Although

it is essential to have a quick drying ink for this purpose, it is

dangerous to go too far, for a too quickly drying ink would make

the paper stick to the forms and tear it. A last condition which

must be fulfilled by a good printing ink is that it must be easy of

removal from the type, which has to be used again.

No one composition will answer every purpose and a number

of different inks are required. Makers of printing inks are obliged,

therefore, to work from definite recipes so as to be able to turn out

exactly the same ink again and again. They make newspaper ink

for rotary presses, book-printing inks, halftone inks, art inks, etc.

As the recipes have been attained only by long, laborious, and

costly experiments, it is obvious that the makers are not disposed

to communicate them, and the recipes that are offered and

published must be looked upon with caution, as many of them

are of little or no value. In the recipes given below for printing

inks, the only intention is to give hints of the general

composition, and the practical man will easily discover what, if

any, alterations have to be made in the recipe for his special purpose.

Many different materials for this manufacture are given in

recipes, so many, in fact, that it is impossible to discover what use

they are in the ink. The following is a list of the articles commonly

in use for the manufacture of printing ink:

Boiled linseed oil, boiled without driers.

Rosin oil from the dry distillation of rosin.

Rosin itself, especially American pine rosin.

Soap, usually rosin-soap, but occasionally ordinary soap.

Lampblack and various other pigments.

STENCIL INKS

1.—Dissolve 1 ounce of gum arabic in 6 ounces water, and

strain. This is the mucilage. For Black Color use drop black,

powdered, and ground with the mucilage to extreme fineness; for

Blue, ultramarine is used in the same manner; for Green, emerald

green; for White, flake white; for Red, vermilion, lake, or carmine; for

Yellow, chrome yellow. When ground too thick they are thinned

with a little water. Apply with a small brush.

2. Triturate together 1 pint pine soot and 2 pints Prussian

blue with a little glycerine, then add 3 pints gum arabic and

sufficient glycerine to form a thin paste.

Blue Stencil Inks.—The basis of the stencil inks commonly

used varies to some extent, some preferring a mixture of pigments

with oils, and others a watery shellac basis. The basis:

1.— Shellac ............................................................. 2 ounces

Borax ............................................................ 1 ½ ounces

Water.............................................................. 10 ounces

Boil together until 10 ounces of solution is obtained. The coloring:

Prussian blue ........................................................... 1 ounce

China clay .............................................................. ½ ounce

Powdered acacia ................................................... ½ ounce

Mix thoroughly and gradually incorporate the shellac

solution.

2.— Prussian blue .................................................. 2 ounces

Lampblack ...................................................... 1 ounce

Gum arabic ..................................................... 3 ounces

Glycerine, sufficient.

Triturate together the dry powders and then make into a

suitable paste with glycerine.

Indelible Stencil Inks.—1.Varnish such as is used for

ordinary printing ink 1 pound; black sulphuret of mercury,

1 pound; nitrate of silver, 1 ounce; sulphate of iron, 1 ounce;

lampblack, 2 tablespoonfuls. Grind all well together; thin with

spirits turpentine as desired.

2.—Sulphate of manganese, 2 parts; lampblack, 1 part; sugar,

4 parts; all in fine powder and triturated to a paste in a little

water.

3.Nitrate of silver, ¼ ounce; water, ¾ ounce. Dissolve, add as

much of the strongest liquor of ammonia as will dissolve the

precipitate formed on its first addition. Then add of mucilage, 1½

drachms, and a little sap green, syrup of buckthorn, or finely

powdered indigo, to color. This turns black on being held near the

fire, or touched with a hot iron.

TYPEWRITER RIBBON INKS.

1.—Take vaseline (petrolatum) of high boiling point, melt it

on a water bath or slow fire, and incorporate by constant stirring

as much lamp or powdered drop black as it will take up without

becoming granular. If the vaseline remains in excess, the print is

liable to have a greasy outline; if the color is in excess, the print

will not be clear. Remove the mixture from the fire, and while it is

cooling mix equal parts of petroleum, benzine, and rectified oil of

turpentine, in which dissolve the fatty ink, introduced in small

portions, by constant agitation. The volatile solvents should be in

such quantity that the fluid ink is of the consistence of fresh oil

paint. One secret of success lies in the proper application of the ink

to the ribbon. Wind the ribbon on a piece of cardboard, spread on

a table several layers of newspaper, then unwind the ribbon in

such lengths as may be most convenient; and lay it flat on the

paper. Apply the ink, after agitation, by means of a soft brush, and

rub it well into the interstices of the ribbon with a toothbrush.

Hardly any ink should remain visible on the surface. For colored

inks use Prussian blue, red lead, etc., and especially the aniline

colors.

2.— Aniline black .................................................. ½ ounce

Pure alcohol .................................................. 15 ounces

Concentrated glycerine ................................ 15 ounces

Dissolve the aniline black in the alcohol, and add the

glycerine. Ink as before. The aniline inks containing glycerine are

copying inks.

3.— Alcohol............................................................. 2 ounces

Aniline color ................................................... ¼ ounce

Water................................................................ 2 ounces

Glycerine ......................................................... 4 ounces

Dissolve the aniline in the alcohol and add the water and

glycerine.

4.— Castor oil .......................................................... 2 ounces

Cassia oil ....................................................... ½ ounce

Carbolic acid ................................................. ½ ounce

Warm them together and add 1 ounce of aniline color.

Indelible typewriter inks may be made by using lampblack in

place of the aniline, mixing it with soft petrolatum and dissolving

the cooled mass in a mixture of equal parts of benzine and turpentine.

Watermark Mixture

Formula No. 1

A mixture of castor oil and wood alcohol used in place of ink

will make a perfect watermark in any kind of hard finish sulphite

or rag bond when applied to a perfectly clean press with good

rollers. Any form or cut will appear as an ordinary watermark

when allowed to dry thoroughly.

No. 2

An emulsion of a suitable printing ink consistency comprises

Canadian balsam 8-20, turpentine 5-17, finely divided substantially

colorless mineral matter such as diatomaceous silica 8-25 and

castor oil 12-30%, emulsified with a slightly alkaline solution

of borax and contains a substantially colorless indicator such as

phenolphthalein reactive to both acids and alkalies, so that it is

suitable for “safety paper” for checks, etc.

Carbon Duplicating Papers (Black)

Formula No. 1

Petroleum Jolly ..................................................... 21 lb.

Japan Wax .............................................................. 6 lb.

Drop Black (Ground in Turpentine) .................. 4 lb.

Ceylon Graphite ..................................................... 4 lb.

Soft Soap .................................................................. 1 lb.

Oil Black Dye ......................................................... 2 oz.

Melt petroleum jelly, wax and soap together, remove from

the fire and stir in oil black when cooler, then grind to a fine

paste with the others. The composition may be applied to the

paper either hot or cold with a fairly stiff brush, then

wipe off the superfluous paste and hang up papers with clips

to dry.

No. 2

Lard Oil .................................................................... 1 gal.

Blacklead ............................................................... 3½ lb.

Lampblack............................................................. 2½ lb.

Oil Black Dye ........................................................... 1 oz.

Dissolve oil black in the warmed lard oil, then mix with

others to a non-lumpy state.

No. 3

Raw Linseed Oil ...................................................... 2 gal.

Tallow ...................................................................... 8 lb.

Lampblack................................................................ 4 lb.

Ceylon Graphite ................................................... 2½ lb.

Oil’ Black Dye ...................................................... 2½ oz.

Warm the oil sufficiently to dissolve the tallow, stir in oil

black and well mix with the others.

No. 4

Methylated Spirit .................................................... 1 gal.

Castor Oil ................................................................. 1 gal.

Lampblack............................................................. 2½ Ib.

Frankfort Black ..................................................... 2½ lb.

Prussian Blue ....................................................... 1½ oz.

Mix as before, previously thoroughly working Prussian blue

into the blacks.

No. 5

Carbon Black ......................................................... 20 g.

Milori Blue ............................................................... 6 g.

Violet Blue ................................................................ 5 g.

Paraffin Oil ............................................................ 32 g.

Montan Wax, Crude ............................................. 15 g.

Montan Wax, Double Bleached ............................. 3 g.

Paraffin Wax (50/52° C.) ...................................... 3 g.

No. 6

Violet

Methyl Violet-Base .................................................. 5 g.

Oleic Acid ............................................................. 10 g.

Montan Wax, Crude ............................................. 60 g.

Petrolatum ............................................................. 90 g.

Copying Paper

Formula No. 1 No. 2

Carnauba Wax 9 g. 31 g.

Montan Wax 6 g. 24 g.

Violet Dye 7 g. 7 g.

Mineral Oil 63 g. 23 g.

Lampblack 15 g. 15 g.

Impregnation or Coatings for Carbon Papers,

Typewriter Ribbons, Etc

Cellulose Nitrate ..................................................... 5 oz.

Acetone ................................................................... 20 oz.

Methanol ................................................................ 20 oz.

Amyl Acetate ......................................................... 40 oz.

Amyl Alcohol ........................................................ 15 oz.

Oleyl Alcohol ........................................................ 25 oz.

Fatty Oil ................................................................... 3 oz.

Stencil Sheets

Formula No. 1

45 g. of gelatin are soaked and dissolved in 200 g. of water.

150 g. of Turkey red oil are well mixed with 80 g. of oleic alcohol,

and 30 g. of chlorinated naphthalene. The mixture is heated to

about 60º C. and is added while being constantly stirred to the

solution containing the gelatin.

To this mixture of gelatin and softening agents 400 g. of

alcohol, in. which 1 g. of dye stuff is dissolved and which are

heated to about 30-40° C., are added and thoroughly mixed

therewith. The composition thus obtained, the solid ingredients of

which are in extremely fine dispersion, is spread out upon the

tissue paper sheets in the usual manner, and is then left to dry

and solidify.

No. 2

45 g. of gelatin are dissolved in 200 g. of water and while the

solution is heated to about 50-60° C., there is added first a

dispersion containing 150 g. of Turkey red oil, 50 g. of oleic

alcohol, 25 g. of chlorinated naphthalene and 50 g. of glycerolmono-

oleate; thereafter there is added 1 g. of dissolved dye stuff

under constant agitation.

No. 3

Yoshino paper is impregnated at 37.7° C. with a liquid

prepared by mixing boiling solutions of gelatin 13 g. and

soap 42.6 g. in water 284 cc. each, and adding almond oil

56.8 cc.

Duplicator Stencil Moistening Fluid

Alcohol ................................................................... 25 cc.

Ethylene Glycol Mono Ethyl Ether .................... 60 cc.

Water ...................................................................... 15 cc.

Duplicating Machine Stencils

The wax-composition used should not be brittle and hard,

but must be tough and elastic.

The paper used is a very fine, thin, fibrous, but tough tissuepaper.

Impregnation: Very thin.

Suggested Mixture:

Beeswax ................................................................. 20 kg.

Soft Ozokerite (60/620 C.) ..................................... 15 kg.

Paraffin Wax (50/52° C.) .................................... 30 kg.

Melt together; mix; apply hot.

Tracing Cloth

Suitable material is impregnated with

Cellulose Acetate ................................................... 20 oz.

Acetone ................................................................... 70 oz.

Water ...................................................................... 10 oz.

This produces a dull frosted film on drying.

Ink for Tattooing Chickens

Pyrogallol ................................................................ 1 g.

Alcohol ................................................................... 10 cc.

Solution of Ferric Chloride ................................... 2 cc.

Acetone .................................................................. 20 cc.

Ink: Writing

Except for the phenol and dye, thin ink is half as concentrated

as the record and copying ink. It is similar to some of the commercial

writing fluids and fountain pen inks. The standard is made in the

same way as the preceding ink, and from materials of the same

quality. If made with slightly more hydrochloric acid than the formula

calls for it will keep longer without depositing sediment, but it will

be more corrosive to steel pens.

The standard formula is:

Tannic Aid .......................................................... 11.7 gm.

Gallic Acid Crystals ............................................. 3.8 grn.

Ferrous Sulphate ................................................ 15.0 gm.

Hydrochloric Acid, Dilute ................................. 12.5 gm.

Phenol (Carbolic Acid) ........................................ 1.0 gm.

Soluble Blue .......................................................... 3.5 gm.

Water to make 1 liter at 20° C. (68° F.).

Writing Ink

(8 times concentrated)

The ingredients are best dissolved as follows:

.................................................... Dissolved in

2 ounces Ferrous sulphate 12/3 oz. of dil. Hydrochloride

3 oz. of Water

0.47 oz. of Soluble Blues 3 oz. of Water

0.13 oz. of Phenol

1.55 oz. of Tannic Acid 6 oz. of Water

0.50 oz. of Gallic Acid

For washing, etc. 21/3 oz. of Water

Dissolve first the Dye and Phenol; pour into this mixture the

acid solution of Iron and then the Tannic-Gallic Acid solution. All

solutions should be heated to about 180° F. and the final mixture

stirred well for some time and then allowed to cool. Let stand

quietly for 1 or 3 days and decant.

Writing Ink

1. Nutgalls Powd. ............................................... 8

2. Logwood Chips .............................................. 8

3. Iron Sulfate ..................................................... 4

4. Gum Acacia ..................................................... 4

5. Aniline Black ................................................... 1

6. Water ............................................................ 167

Dissolve (4) in ½ gal. water and, (5) in 3 gal. water; filter

and mix these two solutions. Boil (1), (2) and (3) in remaining

water for 2½ hours and strain. Mix this liquid with previous

solution.

 

PAINTS, LACQUERS,VARNISHES, ENAMELS

Kalsomine

Sodium carbonate. ................................................. 3 parts

Linseed oil......... ................................................... 32 parts

Hot water.......... .................................................... 8 parts

White glue......... ................................................... 12 parts

Whiting........... .................................................... 160 parts

Dissolve the sodium carbonate, in the hot water, add the oil

and saponify by heating and agitation. Cover the glue, broken

into small pieces, with cold water and let soak overnight. In the

morning pour the whole on a stout piece of stuff and let the

residual water drain off, getting rid of as much as possible by

slightly twisting the cloth. Throw the swelled glue into a capsule,

put on the water bath, and heat gently until it is melted. Add the

saponified oil and mix well; remove from the bath, and stir in

the whiting, a little at a time, adding hot water as it becomes

necessary. When the whiting is all stirred in, continue adding hot

water, until a liquid is obtained that flows freely from the kalsomining

brush.

The addition of a little soluble blue to the mixture increases

the intensity of the white.

Sizing Walls for Kalsomine.—A size to coat over “hot

walls” for the reception of the kalsomine is made by using shellac,

1 part; sal soda, ½ part. Put these ingredients in ½ gallon of water

and dissolve by steady heat. Another size is made of glue size prepared

in the usual way, and alum. To ½ pound of white glue add

¾ pound of alum, dissolving the alum in hot water before

adding it to the glue size.

Various processes have been recommended for making the

odor of kerosene oils, artificial oil of mirbane, etc., but none of

them seems entirely satisfactory. The addition of amyl acetate in

the proportion of 10 grams to the liter (1 per cent) has also been

suggested, several experimenters reporting very successful results

therefrom. Some years ago Beringer proposed a process for

removing sulphur compounds from benzine, which would

presumably be equally applicable to Kerosene.. This process is as

follows:

Potassium permangnate ....................................... 1 ounce

Sulphuric acid ....................................................... ½ pint

Water..................................................................... 3½ pints

Mix the acid and water, and when the mixture has become

cold pour it into a 2-gallon bottle. Add the permanganate and

agitate until it is dissolved. Then add benzine, 1 gallon, and

thoroughly agitate. Allow the liquids to remain in contact for

24 hours, frequently agitating the mixture. Separate the benzine

and wash in a similar bottle with a mixture of

Potassium permanganate ..................................... ¼ ounce

Caustic soda .......................................................... ½ ounce

Water........................................................................ 2 pints

Agitate the mixture frequently during several hours; then

separate the benzine and wash it thoroughly with water. On

agitating the benzine with the acid permanganate solution an

emulsion-like mixture is produced, which separates in a few

seconds, the permanganate slowly subsiding and showing

considerable reduction. In the above process it is quite probable

that the time specified (24 hours) is greatly in excess of what is

necessary, as the reduction takes place almost entirely in a very

short time. It has also been suggested that if the process were

adopted on a manufacturing scale, with mechanical agitation, the

time could be reduced to an hour or two.

Lacquers

(See also Enamels, Glazes, Paints, Varnishes, and

Waterproofing.)

INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING LACQUERS

You will note that the formula for Clear Lacquer calls for 3

ounces of Di-Butyl Phthalate which we call the plastisciser.

When making up a batch of Clear Lacquer which you are going

to put in cans and sell as Clear Lacquer you need to put in this

Di-butyl Phthalate. But if you are going to mix the various colors

with the clear lacquer to make the finished Brushing lacquer to

make the finished. Brushing Lacquer Enamels, DO NOT put in

the Di-Butyl Phthalate. The reason is this. The colors are ground in

a mixture of gum solution and plasticiser, therefore already contain

enough Di-Butyl Phthalate to give the film flexibility. It must GO

IN when using the clear lacquer for Clear Lacquer but not when

using the clear lacquer to mix with colors.

Practically any desirable shade can be obtained by mixing

together in various proportions the colors. You can in this way

make up certain shades of your own and get out a pretty color

card showing your own shades.

When mixing the colors with the clear lacquer be sure to

stir long and thoroughly until all mixed together. Also stir up the

batch before you begin to fill the small cans.

The Brushing Lacquers can be sold to all of the dealers in

your vicinity if you desire, or you can have agents out to sell

them direct to the consumer.

The furniture Lacquer formulas can be sold for all purposes

where a spraying lacquer is required. Furniture factories,

or where woodwork is built and finished Lacquers are often

used.

To make a colored spraying lacquer simply add the colors

to the spraying lacquers instead of to the clear Brushing Lacquer.

For spraying you will probably need to add about one ounce

more black, 2 ounces more yellow, 2 ounces more red, 2 ounces

green, 4 ounces more white and 2 ounces more blue to the gallon

of clear than you would to a gallon of Brushing Clear Lacquer. In

others increase the amount of each color as given above so

that when adding Black Ground Color to the furniture Lacquer

you will have three ounces instead of two ounces. Spraying

Lacquers require a little more pigment to the gallon to get

coverage.

In making up the clear lacquer you first dissolve the cottons

in the Butyl and Ethyl Acetates. Then you add slowly to this the

Damar and Ester Gum solutions which we tell you how to make

is another instruction paper. Then yon can slowly and the alcohol,

Butyl propionate and last of all the Petrol or L.D. Naptha. When

adding each item do so very slowly and stir rapidly. This is

IMPORTANT.

Luminous Outdoor Lacquer

Formula No. 1

¼ kilogram of polystyrene is dissolved in a mixture of ¼

kilogram each of toluene, xylene and butyl acetate; about 40

grams of tricresyl phosphate are added as a softening agent and

about 1 kilogram of a luminous paint, for instance on the base of

strontium sulfide/bismuth and rubidium, is carefully introduced,

while stirring. The lacquer of luminous paint thus obtained can

be applied on ceiling-plaster and wall-plaster, porcelain, glass,

wood, aluminum, metallic supports, paper, pasteboard, artificial

foils or the like, i.e., on any desired base. In some cases it is

advisable to apply a suitable first coating, for instance titanium

white or lithopone in a lacquer of polystyrene, previously to the

application of the luminous paint in order to secure a well

reflecting and weatherproof support.

No. 2

Into a solution consisting of 200 grams of vinyl naphthalene

in a mixture of 200 grams of toluene, 200 grams of xylene, 200

grams of butyl acetate and 30 grams of tricresyl phosphate there

are introduced about 0.8 kilogram of a luminous paint, for

instance a well luminescent zinc sulfide or an organic boric acid

luminous substance. The lacquer of luminous paint thus obtained

is applied on any desired surfaces or articles which are to be

made luminescent.

No. 3

For the preparation of fluorescent and phosphorescent

shaped bodies and foils or the like, about 2½ kilograms of a

luminous paint, for instance on the base of calcium sulfide,

strontium sulfide or zinc sulfide, are introduced into about 12

liters of styrene; a small quantity of sulfuric acid is added and

the whole is heated for about 4 hours to about 140° C. in order

to produce polymerization. As soon as the required consistency is

obtained, the mass is poured into the desired moulds and allowed

to solidify. Foils can likewise be sprayed or rolled from this

product.

Metal Painting

Preparing the Surface.—To obtain the best results with red-lead,

care should be exercised in applying as well as mixing the paint.

A vital point is to clean off all loose rust, dirt and other foreign

material before commencing to paint. Wire brushes and scrapers

will be found to be effective in removing rust and scale. The sand

blast will give good results and is strongly recommended, but

thorough scraping and brushing will usually be satisfactory.

Rust, the great enemy of iron and steel, is an accelerator of

further rusting when it is loose enough to retain moisture. If rust

is allowed to remain it will work disaster even after the paint

has been applied. Besides, rust and dirt are likely to cause

peeling.

Number of Coats.—Three coats of paint are necessary on all

outside work. Two coats will do for metal indoors. In no case

will one coat of paint completely cover bare metal. To the naked

eye, the metal may appear to be covered but under the microscope

it is another story. Many small pinholes and air bubbles will be

found. Even a second coat will not absolutely cover all these

pinholes. A third coat is really necessary. Of course, the more the

paint is brushed out, the more the pinholes and air bubbles are

worked out. Plenty of good brushing effort is essential to a firstclass

job.

Mixing the Paint.—Paint is made with paste red-lead exactly

as white-lead paint is made with heavy pista white-lead, by

simply adding linseed oil a little at a time and stirring constantly

with a wooden paddle. Dry red-lead is mixed with oil in the same

manner, the only difference being that it is less easy to incorporate

with the oil.

first with just enough linseed oil to make a workable paste; then

add the coloring material and finally the remainder of the oil.

When drier is used, put it in after the coloring material and before

adding the final oil.

Applying the Paint.—Steel and iron should never be painted

during wet weather nor when covered with dew or frost. Early

morning painting during the late summer months is not

recommended as a usual thing. It is always better to wail until

the sun has had time to dry everything out. It is bad practice to

attempt painting in freezing weather.

Red-lead paint can best be applied with a round or

oval brush. Be sure to use plenty of paint, covering the surface well

and not attempting to make a gallon of paint go too far. Pay

particular attention to bolts, rivet heads, edges and corners, as

they are more subject to destructive influences than perfectly flat

surfaces.

The priming coat is the most important. Extra care and

precaution should be taken during its application.

Allow plenty of time between coats for the previous coat to

dry thoroughly. A week is not too long, especially for the priming

coat.

Boat Painting

The practice in painting boats is regulated largely by one

thing—the type of craft. If a boat is a yacht or a launch the owner

aims to keep it always clean and bright. Its appearance is a

matter of pride with him. Hence the handsomest job obtainable

is none too fine, and coat upon coat of paint is often applied in

order to get an unusually fine finish.

A rowboat, on the other hand, is not a show boat. While the

possessor of one or a fleet of them wants a job that looks well,

only an ordinarily good finish is called for.

When it comes to canoes an altogether different problem

is presented. A high-class finish is wanted, but it is not

obtained in the same way, because a canoe is usually built of

canvas.

For present purposes, therefore, boats have been classified

into three groups: Power and Sail Boats; Row Boats;

Canvas Canoes. In this order, directions for painting them are

taken up.

Power and Sail Boats.—The outside of the hull, deck-House

and some parts of the interior are proper subjects for the paint

brush. Some of these parts should receive attention, at least

every year.

Preparing the Surface.—If the wood is new, dust it off

carefully and cover all knots and sappy streaks with orange

shellac. The shellac can be made by thinning dry orange gum

shellac with good quality denatured alcohol, proportioned on the

basis of three pounds of shellac to one gallon of alcohol, or the

liquid shellac may be purchased as “3 pound cut pure orange

shellac.” Brush the shellac on thin. If it is put on too thick the

paint will alligator, leaving the knots bare.

Galvanized Iron, Treatment before Painting

Some people, before painting it, wash the galvanized metal

with vinegar. This is said to be good. Others scrub it well with

burlap wet with benzine. Scrubbing the surface with soap and sand

can be recommended. The best method seems to be, however, to

leave the galvanized metal exposed to the weather for a few

months.

Still others report good results from washing the wellcleaned

surface with a one per cent solution of copper chloride,

acetate or sulphate. The solution is left on for a time and then

brushed off before painting is attempted. A few months of

 exposure is probably better, however, even than this treatment.

Light sand-blasting is also said to have been used for cleaning

galvanized iron and putting it in condition to take paint. No

doubt this would accomplish the purpose.

Even in the case of perfectly clean zinc, it is not easy to get

paint to stick always. No paint yet invented adheres to it as well

as in the case of iron or wood. What chemists call ‘’the surface

tension” is different. Not that any good paint invariably all comes

off. Generally most of it stays on but that is not very satisfactory.

If galvanized iron is weathered and then well cleaned,

there is seldom any trouble encountered when the paint is redlead.

Probably most of the difficulties in painting galvanized

surfaces are traceable to improper preparation done by not too

expensive labor. This is why weathering, which does not skip

anything, is best.

Synthetic Resin Finishes

Oxidizing rezyl solutions make excellent vehicles for

aluminium-bronze finishes for either interior or exterior work, the

powder being mixed just prior to application. For general decorative

work, rezyl 114 is recommended as giving a. quick and harddrying

gloss. Rezyl 1102 is exceptionally resistant to heat, hence

well adapted for use on steam pipes, radiators and the like, as

well as for prolonged baking at high temperatures. For oil refinery

and filling station equipment, aluminium finishes made from

rezyl 1102 are recommended, because resistant to petrol. Typical

formulas follow:

Rezyl 114, 100 lb. and coal-tar naphtha 100 lb. (J and 33 lb.

of xylol); mineral spirits, 70 lb.; lead linoleate, 2 lb.; cobalt

linoleate, ¾ lb.; aluminium-bronze, 70 lb.; total, 342¾ lb. or 38¾

gal. This is an air-drying finish for brush application.

A baking finish for spray application is made as follows:

Rezyl 1102, 100 lb.; xylol, 150 lb. (same as Solution A, 250 lb.);

toluol, 150 lb.; cobalt linoleate, ½ lb.; aluminium-bronze, 70 lb.;

total, 470½ lb. or 55¼ gal.

A harder and quicker-drying, but somewhat brittle, vehicle

for indoor use can be obtained by blending rezyl 114 with

cumarone resin. Rezyl 113 in equal parts of coal-tar naphtha and

mineral spirits is recommended as an aluminium-bronze vehicle for

outdoor use. Its adhesion, toughness, rapid drying, durability

make it superior to the long-oil spar varnish ordinarily used for

this purpose. It works more easily than rezyl 1102, dries a trifle

more slowly but forms a more flexible film, and hence is well

adapted for all types of exposed metal work. Rezyl 110 dries

somewhat more slowly than rezyl 113, but brushes more easily

and permits of the use of mineral spirits with aluminium-bronze

for priming wood, for which its elasticity, adhesion and durability

recommend it. When used in metal paints, the vehicle should

contain 10 per cent of coal-tar naphtha and 10 per cent raw

linseed oil to insure proper floating and leafing of the aluminiumbronze.

Although rezyl 1103 is still slower drying than rezyl 110,

it makes aluminium paints with excellent working qualities for

brush application.

Good adhesion and elasticity make the oxidizing rezyls

excellent for quick-drying undercoats. The following are typical

formulas in addition to the primer formulas already given:

Baking primer: Iron oxide, 150 lb.; rezyl 110, 100 lb. and

xylol, 43 lb.; V. M. and P. naphtha, 155 lb.; lead linoleate, 2 lb.;

manganese linoleate, ¾ lb.; total, 450¾ lb. or 38¼ gal. For best

results, this primer is applied in a thin film and baked at least one

hour at 200° F.

A surfacer which has given good results in both air-drying

and baking is formulated as follows: Iron oxide, 50 lb.; lithopone,

50 lb.; black mineral filler, 300 lb.; silica, 100 lb.; rezyl 114, 100 lb.

and xylol, 100 lb.; mineral spirits, 50 lb.; turpentine, 30 lb.; lead

linoleate, 2 lb.; manganese linoleate, ¾ lb.; total, 782¾ or 57¾

gal. Several coats of this surfacer can be applied in rapid

succession, and the whole film baked hard in one operation. It has

good water-resistance, elasticity and toughness, yet sands easily

and lacquer can be applied over it without lifting.


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