E-waste Recycling (Electronic Waste, E-waste, E-scrap, Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (weee)) Disposal and Management

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E Waste Recycling plant (Electronic waste, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE)) - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process

E-waste is a popular informal name for electronic product nearing the end of their useful life. Computers, televisions, VCR, stereos, copier, and fax machine are common electronic product .Many of these product can be reused, refurbished and recycled. Electronic waste is only a subset of wee (waste electrical and electronic equipment). Electronic appliances are composed of hundreds of different materials that can be both toxic but also of high value. Gold, silver, copper, platinum etc. are valuable materials which recyclers recover from e-waste. In India, e-waste is mostly generated in large cities like Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore. In these cities a complex e-waste handling structure has developed mainly based on a long tradition of waste recycling . Currently, a few players like Sims Recycling, Ecoreco and E-Parisara, located in Chennai, Mumbai and Bangalore respectively are operational in the organized sector. These shred e-waste in very small quantities and export the pulverized e-waste for precious metal recovery in smelting refineries abroad. The boom in IT industry has a negative concern as well as: e-waste. It is a major concern for the Ministry of Environment and Forest . The scope for e-waste recycling project is very good. New entrepreneurs venturing into this field will be successful
Plant capacity: Monitor -10 Pcs/Day, Plastic Dana “ 5.33 M.T/Day,Copper Wire Scrap-9 Kg/day, Glass Scrap from C.R.T-270 Kg/Day, Other Metals-800 Kg/Day Plant & machinery: 51 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 196 Lakhs
Return: 47.00%Break even: 40.00%
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Good Future Prospects for E-WASTE RECYCLING PLANT (Electronic waste, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE)) - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey

Electronic waste, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a loose category of surplus, obsolete, broken, or discarded electrical or electronic devices. The processing of electronic waste in developing countries is causeing serious health and pollution problems due to lack of containment, as do unprotected landfilling (due to leaching) and incineration. The Basel Convention and regulation by the European Union and United States aim to reduce these problems. Reuse and recycling of these e-waste are promoted as alternatives to disposal as trash. There was unanimity that electronic waste containing substances like lead, cadmium, mercury, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) have immense potential to cause enormous harm to human health and environment, if not disposed properly since the exact prescriptions for its disposal and safeguard were inadequate. Thus, the imperative need for early formulation of a holistic E-waste legislation which will eventually lead to enabling policy. It was consequently agreed that such a policy must appropriately reflect the concerns of various stakeholders, besides the views of practitioners both in the organized and unorganized sector. European countries have taken a systematic step towards the handling disposal and recycling of e-waste. There are several plants established for this particular purpose where large amount of electronic waste are recycled using the best technologies. A new trend in recycling is reuse of these waste contents. Apart from these new technologies; screening, reuse, granulating, refining, conditioning are also important processes in recycling. Today, the electronic waste recycling business, in all areas of the developed world has become a large and rapidly consolidating business. The electronic waste processing systems have matured in recent years, following increased regulatory, public and commercial scrutiny, and with a commensurate increase in entrepreneurial interest. Part of this evolution have involved greater diversion of electronic waste from energy-intensive down cycling processes (e.g., conventional recycling), where equipment is reverted to a raw material form. This diversion is achieved through reuse and refurbishing. The environmental and social benefits of reuse include diminished demand for new products and virgin raw materials (with their own environmental issues), larger quantities of pure water and electricity for associated manufacturing, less packaging per unit, availability of technology to wider swaths of society due to greater affordability of products; and diminished use of landfills. Audiovisual components, televisions, VCRs, stereo equipment, mobile phones, other handheld devices, and computer components contain valuable elements and substances suitable for reclaimation, including lead, copper, and gold. Mostly employed in traditional e-waste disposal methods, this process refers to converting all the e-waste fractions into reusable components. Secondary raw materials are also extracted from these waste contents. Manual dismantling signifies process of electronic items and tools being dismantled in an orderly sequence. Once dismantling is done, manual sorting of different e waste is completed in separate categories like metals, batteries, printed wiring boards, plastics, woods, cathode ray tubes, condensers, LCDs and cables etc. These different elements are then processed through refining and conditioning steps. There is an estimate that the total obsolete computers originating from government offices, business houses, industries and household is of the order of 2 million . Manufactures and assemblers in a single calendar year, estimated to produce around 1200 tons of electronic scrap. It should be noted that obsolence rate of personal computers (PC) is one in every two years. The consumers finds it convenient to buy a new computer rather than upgrade the old one due to the changing configuration, technology and the attractive offers of the manufacturers. Due to the lack of governmental legislations on e-waste, standards for disposal, proper mechanism for handling these toxic hi-tech products, mostly end up in landfills or partly recycled in a unhygienic conditions and partly thrown into waste streams. Computer waste is generated from the individual households, government, both public and private sectors, computer retailers, manufacturers, foreign embassies, secondary markets of old PCs.etc. Of these, the biggest source of PC scrap are foreign countries that export huge computer waste in the form of reusable components. With the extensive use of computers and electronic equipments, people are dumping old electronic goods for new ones, the amount of E-Waste generated has been steadily increasing. At present Bangalore alone generates about 8000 tonnes of computer waste annually and in the absence of proper disposal, they find their way to scrap dealers. Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing environmental problems of the world. In India, the electronic waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of our own waste but also dumping of e-waste i.e computer waste from the developed countries. The scope for e-waste recycling project is very good. New entrepreneurs venturing into this field will be successful
Plant capacity: Monitor -10 Pcs/Day, Plastic Granules – 5.33 M.T/Day, Copper Wire Scrap-9 Kg/day, Glass Scrap from C.R.T-270 Kg/Day,Other Metals-800 Kg/DayPlant & machinery: 51 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 196 Lakhs
Return: 47.00%Break even: 40.00%
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E-WASTE RECYCLING PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Electronic waste, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a loose category of surplus, obsolete, broken, or discarded electrical or electronic devices. The processing of electronic waste in developing countries is causing serious health and pollution problems due to lack of containment, as do unprotected land filling (due to leaching) and incineration. The Basel Convention and regulation by the European Union and United States aim to reduce these problems. Reuse and recycling of this e-waste are promoted as alternatives to disposal as trash. There are several plants established for this particular purpose where large amount of electronic waste are recycled using the best technologies. A new trend in recycling is reuse of these waste contents. Apart from these new technologies; screening, reuse, granulating, refining, conditioning are also important processes in recycling. There is an estimate that the total obsolete computers originating from government offices, business houses, industries and household is of the order of 2 million. Manufactures and assemblers in a single calendar year, estimated to produce around 1200 tons of electronic scrap. It should be noted that obsolesce rate of personal computers (PC) is one in every two years. The consumers find it convenient to buy a new computer rather than upgrade the old one due to the changing configuration, technology and the attractive offers of the manufacturers. Due to the lack of governmental legislations on e-waste, standards for disposal, proper mechanism for handling these toxic hi-tech products, mostly end up in landfills or partly recycled in a unhygienic conditions and partly thrown into waste streams. Computer waste is generated from the individual households, government, both public and private sectors, computer retailers, manufacturers, foreign embassies, secondary markets of old PCs.etc. Of these, the biggest source of PC scrap is foreign countries that export huge computer waste in the form of reusable components. The scope for e-waste recycling project is very good. New entrepreneurs’ venturing into this field will be successful. Cost Estimation: Capacity : Monitor 10 Pcs. Per Day. Plastic Dana 5.33 MT Per Day E-Waste Recycling Plant Copper Wire Scrap 9 Kgs/Day Glass Scrap From Crt 270 Kgs/Day Other Metal 800 Kgs Per Day
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: 51 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 196 Lakhs (W/C 1 Month)
Return: 47.00%Break even: 40.00%
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E Waste Recycling Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

E waste is a popular, informal name for electronic products nearing the end of their useful life. Computers, televisions, VCRs, stereos, copiers, and fax machines are common electronic products. Many of these products can be reused, refurbished, or recycled. Unfortunately, electronic discards are one of the fastest growing segments of our nation's waste stream. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the EU, and is estimated to be increasing by 16 to 28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Electronic wastes, e waste, e scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. Technically, electronic waste is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. Because loads of surplus electronics are frequently commingled (good, recyclable, and non recyclable), several public policy advocates apply the term e waste broadly to all surplus electronics. Uses & Application Electronic Waste – or e waste – is the term used to describe old, end of life electronic appliances such as computers, laptops, TVs, DVD players, mobile phones, mp3 players etc. which have been disposed of by their original users. While there is no generally accepted definition of e waste, in most cases, e waste comprises of relatively expensive and essentially durable products used for data processing, telecommunications or entertainment in private households and businesses. Market Survey WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16 28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another.
Plant capacity: 5 MT/DayPlant & machinery: 60 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 241 Lakhs
Return: 15.00%Break even: 43.00%
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E - WASTE RECYCLING Electronic Waste, E Waste, E scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (weee) - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery

E waste is a popular, informal name for electronic products nearing the end of their useful life. Computers, televisions, VCRs, stereos, copiers, and fax machines are common electronic products. Many of these products can be reused, refurbished, or recycled. Unfortunately, electronic discards are one of the fastest growing segments of our nation's waste stream. Electronic wastes, e waste, e scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. Technically, electronic waste is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. WEEE Categories are: Large household appliances; Small household appliances; IT and telecommunications equipments (Consumer equipments, Lighting equipments, Electrical and electronic tools Toys, leisure and sports equipment Medical devices, Monitoring and control instruments ,Automatic dispensers). A range of techniques is currently applied for retrieving components and materials from WEEE. The essential features of these systems generally conform to a scheme of: sorting/disassembly; size reduction; separation. Market Survey WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16 28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. Almost 50% of the PC's sold in India are products from the secondary market and are re assembled on old components. The remaining market share is covered by multinational manufacturers (30%) and Indian brands (22%). The WEEE Directive is impacting companies and authorities in two ways. Firstly, it applies constraints on how they operate in terms of provision and disposal of equipment, thereby increasing direct costs. The longer term benefits in reduction of environmental impact, and hence cost, should not be ignored, however. Secondly, the need to establish widespread recovery methodologies will provide the opportunity to enhance and to build business operations that generate profit from recycling of WEEE. ? Cost Estimation Capacity Monitor : 10.00 Nos./ Day Plastic Dana : 5,330.00 Kgs/ Day Copper Wire Scraps : 25.00 Kgs/ Day Glass from CRT : 350.00 Kgs/ Day Other Metals : 1,500.00 Kgs/ Day
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: Rs.219 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : Rs.489 Lakhs
Return: 24.00%Break even: 46.00%
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E–WASTE RECYCLING PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

E-waste is a popular, informal name for electronic products nearing the end of their useful life. Computers, televisions, VCRs, stereos, copiers, and fax machines are common electronic products. While there is no generally accepted definition of e-waste, in most cases, e-waste comprises of relatively expensive and essentially durable products used for data processing, telecommunications or entertainment in private households and businesses. According to the recent survey, electronic discards are one of the fastest growing segments of our nation's waste stream. Electronic wastes, e-waste , e-scrap , or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment ( WEEE ) is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. According to the OECD, any appliance using an electric power supply that has reached its end-of-life would come under WEEE. Technically, electronic waste is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. Because loads of surplus electronics are frequently coming led (good, recyclable, and non-recyclable), several public policy advocates apply the term e-waste broadly to all surplus electronics. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the EU, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. There is also a lack of definition around the specific details of the treatment requirements of WEEE. It is therefore, the process of recycling of components containing hazardous compounds such as halogenated chlorides and bromides used as flame-retardants in plastics, Copper, PVC sheathing of wires etc., has emerged as a life threatening process, as recycling of such materials produces harmful dioxins. Land filling e-waste, one of the most widely used methods of disposal, is prone to hazards because of leachate which often contains heavy water resources. Older landfill sites and uncontrolled dumps pose a much greater danger of releasing hazardous emissions. Mercury, Cadmium and Lead are among the most toxic leachates. Market survey WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. The first comprehensive study to estimate the annual generation of e-waste in India and answer the questions above is being undertaken up by the National WEEE Taskforce. So far the preliminary estimates suggest that total WEEE generation in India is approximately 1, 46,000 tons per year. The top states in order of highest contribution to WEEE include Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Delhi, Karnataka, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Punjab. The city wise ranking of largest WEEE generators is Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Kolkata, Ahmadabad, Hyderabad, Pune, Surat and Nagpur. Almost 50% of the PC's sold in India are products from the secondary market and are re-assembled on old components. The remaining market share is covered by multinational manufacturers (30%) and Indian brands (22%).
Plant capacity: 2164500 kgs. /annumPlant & machinery: Rs. 233 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project: Rs. 500 Lakhs
Return: 22.00%Break even: 49.00%
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E–Waste Recycling Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

E-waste is a popular, informal name for electronic products nearing the end of their useful life. While there is no generally accepted definition of e-waste, in most cases, e-waste comprises of relatively expensive and essentially durable products used for data processing, telecommunications or entertainment in private households and businesses. Electronic wastes, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) are a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. So far the preliminary estimates by the National WEEE Taskforce suggest that total WEEE generation in India is approximately 1, 46,000 tons per year. This give rise to the demand of recycling plants to reuse/recycle the waste from electronics world.
Plant capacity: 2164500 kgs. /annumPlant & machinery: Rs. 233 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project: Rs. 500 Lakhs
Return: 22.91%Break even: 49.81%
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E–Waste Recycling Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Electronic wastes, "e-waste", "e-scrap", or "Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment" ("WEEE") is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. Technically, electronic "waste" is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. Because loads of surplus electronics are frequently commingled (good, recyclable, and non-recyclable), several public policy advocates apply the term "e-waste" broadly to all surplus electronics. E-Waste Recycling Technology Used in India: Decontamination, Dismantling, Pulverization/ Hammering, Shredding, Density separation using water, E-waste trade value chain, Environmentally Sound E-waste Treatment Technology, CRT treatment technology. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. New entrepreneurs can well venture in this sector.
Plant capacity: 2164500 Kgs /AnnumPlant & machinery: Rs. 233 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : Rs. 526 Lakhs
Return: 28.00%Break even: 46.00%
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E–Waste Recycling Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Electronic wastes, "e-waste", "e-scrap", or "Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment" ("WEEE") is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. Technically, electronic "waste" is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. Because loads of surplus electronics are frequently commingled (good, recyclable, and non-recyclable), several public policy advocates apply the term "e-waste" broadly to all surplus electronics. E-Waste Recycling Technology Used in India: Decontamination, Dismantling, Pulverization/ Hammering, Shredding, Density separation using water, E-waste trade value chain, Environmentally Sound E-waste Treatment Technology, CRT treatment technology. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. New entrepreneurs can well venture in this sector.
Plant capacity: 2164500 Kgs /AnnumPlant & machinery: Rs. 233 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : Rs. 526 Lakhs
Return: 28.00%Break even: 46.00%
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E–Waste Recycling Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Electronic wastes, "e-waste", "e-scrap", or "Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment" ("WEEE") is a description of surplus, obsolete, broken or discarded electrical or electronic devices. Technically, electronic "waste" is the component which is dumped or disposed or discarded rather than recycled, including residue from reuse and recycling operations. Electronic Waste – or e-waste – is the term used to describe old, end-of-life electronic appliances such as computers, laptops, TVs, DVD players, mobile phones, mp3 players etc. which have been disposed of by their original users. Composition of e-waste is very diverse and differs in products across different categories. It contains more than 1000 different substances, which fall under “hazardous” and “non-hazardous” categories. Broadly, it consists of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, glass, wood & plywood, printed circuit boards, concrete and ceramics, rubber and other items. Iron and steel constitutes about 50% of the e-waste followed by plastics (21%), non-ferrous metals (13%) and other constituents. Non-ferrous metals consist of metals like copper, aluminium and precious metals ex. silver, gold, platinum, palladium etc. The presence of elements like lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, selenium, and hexavalent chromium and flame-retardants beyond threshold quantities in e-waste classifies them as hazardous waste. WEEE has been identified as one of the fastest growing sources of waste in the India, and is estimated to be increasing by 16-28 per cent every five years. Within each sector a complex set of heterogeneous secondary wastes is created. Although treatment requirements are complicated, the sources from any one sector possess many common characteristics. However, there exist huge variations in the nature of electronic wastes between sectors, and treatment regimes appropriate for one cannot be readily transferred to another. As a whole E–Waste Recycling is a good project for entrepreneurs for investment.
Plant capacity: Monitor : 3000 Pcs. /annum,Plastic Dana: 1559 MT/annum,Copper Wire Scraps: 7.5 MT/annum,Glass from CRT : 105 MT/annum,Other Metals: 450 MT/annumPlant & machinery: Rs. 233 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : Rs. 526 Lakhs
Return: 28.00%Break even: 46.00%
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  • T.C.I is Total Capital Investment
  • We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
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