Maize (Corn) Products in India (Starch, Glucose, Dextrose, Sorbitol) Trends, Opportunities, Market Analysis and Forecasts (Upto 2017)

New

Maize (Corn) Products in India (Starch, Glucose, Dextrose, Sorbitol) Trends, Opportunities, Market Analysis and Forecasts (Upto 2017)

Author: NPCS Team
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9789381039359
Code: NI264
Pages: 137
Price: Rs. 57,500.00   US$ 2,400.00

Published: 2014
Publisher: NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES
Usually ships within 4 days



Add to Cart

Recommend to Friend

Download as PDF

Bookmark and Share



The market research report titled Maize (Corn) Products in India (Starch, Glucose, Dextrose, Sorbitol) Trends, Opportunities, Market Analysis and Forecasts (Upto 2017)’ released by Niir Project Consultancy Services, provides a comprehensive analysis on Indian maize products industry. Starch, Glucose, Dextrose and Sorbitol are maize products covered in this report. The report starts with a brief on the global scenario of maize and then proceeds to analyze the Indian scenario. The report provides an overview on Maize as a crop giving information about its soil suitability, sowing seasons and the types of maize that are produced in the nation. Maize is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It is also one of the most important cereal crops globally and in India it is the third most important crop after rice and wheat. The suitability of maize to diverse environments is unmatched by any other crop and even every part of the maize plant has economic value: the grain, leaves, stalk, tassel, and cob can all be used to produce a large variety of food and non-food products. As it has yield potential far higher than any other cereal, it is sometimes referred to as the miracle crop or the ‘Queen of Cereals’.
It further explains the ways by which maize can be processed and the byproducts after such processes. Maize can be processed by two ways: Dry Milling and Wet Milling. Dry milling of maize produces corn meal, grits, germ and animal feed and wet milling produces starch, gluten and husk. These byproducts of maize processing are used in industries like paper, textiles, pharmaceutical and food & confectionary. Half of the maize in India is consumed as poultry feed, ~1/5 for human consumption and the rest is consumed for starch production, as cattle feed and in breweries.
The report provides detailed analysis of the industry by covering areas like growth drivers, trends in the industry as well as the SWOT analysis of the industry. Growth in the consumption of maize products will be majorly driven by the starch segment. Starch industry is often termed as sunrise sector of the nation apparently because of its widespread applicability across various industries. Maize starch in India is used relentlessly in paper, textile, pharma and food industry. The growth in these consumer industries will evidently be felt in the starch sector also. The report elucidates important numbers and forecasts of the consumer industries for better understanding. Also rising demand from the poultry sector will drive the volumes for maize products.
One of the trends that have been experienced in the industry is the innovative use of corn starch. Applications of corn starch are not just limited to the industries mentioned above; it has found its relevance in products like bags and car parts. Usage of corn starch bags is rising in India on the back of it being bio-degradable and hence environment friendly. They can also handle more weight and have longer shelf life. Corn starch is also being used in manufacturing of car parts to enhance the car safety aspects. Other trends are emergence of corn oil as an edible oil and also production of ethanol from corn.
The report enhances your understanding of the market by giving detailed SWOT analysis. The industry’s biggest strength is the ready available market for its products. Growing population of India coupled with unavoidable usage of maize products in various industries keeps demand high. Abundant availability of its key raw material i.e. Maize in the country is an added advantage for the industry. Area under maize has grown at a CAGR of 2% during 2007-12 whereas production has grown at a CAGR of ~7.5% during the same period. Indian production of maize in 2013-14 could reach 25 million tonnes owing to adequate monsoon which may trigger higher acreage across growing states. India’s per capita consumption of starch is also very low when compared to developed economies like US and China. India with its huge population base and low consumption levels offers a massive opportunity for the starch companies to capture. And since most of the starch in India is produced by maize, maize processing companies have sufficient pie of the market to capture. Growing urbanization, changing consumer preferences and rising disposable incomes are another bunch of opportunities for the incumbents. The industry however is faced with challenges like growing competition in the sector and raw material fluctuations. The industry’s raw material being agricultural in nature is subject to price fluctuations as well as production uncertainty.   The report provides an overview on the technical side of the industry by elucidating the list of machinery required for maize processing plant.
The report further provides you with scrutiny of demand supply scenario in the industry along with the market forecasts. The demand for processed maize products can be established by the growth in the maize consumption. Maize has varied applications and is consumed by several industries which process it and produce its byproducts. India’s consumption of maize has been rising at a CAGR of ~6% during 2006-07 to 2011-12 and we anticipate this consumption rate to continue in the near future and maize consumption will rise to 25.2 million tonnes by 2016-17E. The report also includes sales data of starch, glucose, dextrose and sorbitol by selected producers. The report presents the supply side with help of upcoming projects of the present players. It also offers total starch production numbers along with production numbers of starch, dextrose, glucose and sorbitol by some major players.
The report also provides key player profiles along with key financials and comparison. The report covers companies like Anil Ltd, Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd, Tirupati Starch & Chemicals Ltd and Gujarat Ambuja Exports Ltd in detail. The report shares vital information like shareholding pattern, revenue mix, plant location and financial summary of the aforesaid companies. The next segment provides complete financial comparison of maize processing companies as well as feed companies.
Various changes in the Indian spending patterns as well as consumption boom in the nation have given maize products increased applicability and hence the demand for maize products is ascending. Maize processing in India is fragmented and quite unorganized which limits us to capture the exact size of the industry.   Industry in the past has grown at a healthy rate and we estimate it to continue its ride at the same velocity. We anticipate the maize consumption to rise to 25.2 million tonnes by 2016-17E.
Reasons for Buying this Report:

• This research report helps you get a detail picture of the industry by providing overview of the industry along with the market structure and classification    
• The report provides market analysis covering major growth driving factors for the industry and latest market trends in the industry
• This report helps to understand the present status of the industry by elucidating a comprehensive SWOT analysis and scrutiny of the demand supply situation
• Report provides analysis and in-depth financial comparison of major players/competitors
• The report provides forecasts of key parameters which helps to anticipate the industry performance
Our Approach:
• Our research reports broadly cover Indian markets, present analysis, outlook and forecast for a period of five years.
• The market forecasts are developed on the basis of secondary research and are cross-validated through interactions with the industry players
• We use reliable sources of information and databases.   And information from such sources is processed by us and included in the report

^ Top

Contents

Hide Down
1. OVERVIEW
1.1 TYPES OF MAIZE
1.2 MAIZE PROCESSING METHODS & BY PRODUCTS
2. MARKET ANALYSIS
2.1 INDUSTRY GROWTH DRIVERS
2.1.1 Blooming starch industry
2.1.2 Burgeoning food industry
2.1.3 Rising paper consumption
2.1.4 Growing textile industry
2.1.5 Opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry
2.1.6 Rising demand from Feed industry
2.2 EMERGING TRENDS IN THE INDUSTRY
2.2.1 Corn Oil
2.2.2 Corn starch – New Applications
2.2.3 Corn to ethanol
2.3 SWOT ANALYSIS
2.3.1 Strengths
2.3.1.1 Ready market base
2.3.1.2 Abundant raw material
2.3.1.3 Widespread applicability
2.3.2 Weaknesses
2.3.2.1 Raw material fluctuations
2.3.3 Opportunities
2.3.3.1 Low per capita consumption of starch
2.3.3.2 Urbanization
2.3.3.3 Rising Disposable Incomes & Discretionary Spends
2.3.4 Threats
2.3.4.1 Competition
2.4 MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT
2.4.1 Machinery for starch plant
2.4.2 Machinery for liquid glucose and dextrose plant
2.4.3 Machinery for Sorbitol Plant
3. MARKET FORECASTS
3.1 Demand
3.1.1 Starch
3.1.2 Glucose & Dextrose
3.1.3 Sorbitol
3.2 Supply
3.2.1 Starch
3.2.2 Glucose & Dextrose
3.2.3 Sorbitol
3.3 Foreign Trade
4. KEY PLAYERS
4.1 SUKHJIT STARCH & CHEMICALS LTD
4.2 TIRUPATI STARCH & CHEMICALS LTD
4.3 GUJARAT AMBUJA EXPORTS LTD
4.4 ANIL LTD
5. KEY FINANCIALS & ANALYSIS
5.1 CONTACT INFORMATION
5.1.1 Registered office address
5.1.1.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.1.1.2 Feed Companies
5.1.2 Director’s Name
5.1.2.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.1.2.2 Feed Companies
5.2 KEY FINANCIALS
5.2.1 Plant Locations
5.2.1.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.2.1.2 Feed Companies
5.2.2 Raw Material Consumption
5.2.2.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.2.2.2 Feed Companies
5.2.3 Plant Capacity & Sales
5.2.3.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.2.3.2 Feed Companies
5.3 FINANCIAL COMPARISON
5.3.1 Assets
5.3.1.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.1.2 Feed Companies
5.3.2 Liabilities
5.3.2.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.2.2 Feed Companies
5.3.3 Growth in assets & liabilities
5.3.3.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.3.2 Feed Companies
5.3.4 Income & Expenditure
5.3.4.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.4.2 Feed Companies
5.3.5 Growth in Income & Expenditure
5.3.5.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.5.2 Feed Companies
5.3.6 Profits
5.3.6.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.6.2 Feed Companies
5.3.7 Liquidity Ratios
5.3.7.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.7.2 Feed Companies
5.3.8 Profitability Ratios
5.3.8.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.8.2 Feed Companies
5.3.9 Return Ratios
5.3.9.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.9.2 Feed Companies
5.3.10 Working Capital & Turnover Ratios
5.3.10.1 Maize Processing Companies
5.3.10.2 Feed Companies
6. INDUSTRY SIZE & OUTLOOK


LIST OF FIGURES & TABLES
Figure 1 Top Maize producing countries in the world
Figure 2 Consumption pattern of maize in India
Figure 3 Size of Indian processed food industry (In INR Billion, 2012-17E)
Figure 4 Paper consumption in India (2012-17E, In Million Tonnes)
Figure 5 Size of Indian textile industry (2012-17E, In INR Billion)
Figure 6 Per capita consumption of medicines in major countries (In USD)
Figure 7 Size of Indian pharmaceutical industry (2012-17E, In INR billion)
Figure 8 Population of India (2008-17E, In Millions)
Figure 9 Production of Maize in India (2007-14, In Million Tonnes)
Figure 10 Area under maize cultivation in India (2007-12, In Million Hectares)
Figure 11 Growth trend of maize production- kharif (2007-12)
Figure 12 MCX spot price of Maize (Oct 2013-Dec 2013)
Figure 13 Consumption comparison of starch
Figure 14 Indian population structure- Rural & Urban
Figure 15 Growing discretionary spend in India
Figure 16 India's annual per capita income (2008-13, In INR)
Figure 17 Domestic Consumption of Maize in India (2007-12, In Million Tonnes)
Figure 18 Domestic consumption of maize in India (2013-17E, In Million Tonnes)
Figure 19 Sorbitol sales growth (2007-17E, In '000 Tonnes)
Figure 20 Total production of starch by top players (2011, In '000 Tonnes)
Figure 21 Starch production in India (2010-17E, In '000 Tonnes)
Figure 22 Sorbitol production by selected producers (2007-17E, In '000 Tonnes)
Figure 23 Foreign trade of corn starch in India (2011-17E, In INR Million)
Figure 24 Foreign trade of maize gluten (2012-13, In INR Million)
Figure 25 Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Shareholding Pattern (Dec 2013)
Figure 26 Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Revenue distribution (March 2013)
Figure 27 Tirupati Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Shareholding Pattern (Dec 2013)
Figure 28 Tirupati Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Revenue distribution (March 2013)
Figure 29 GAEL- Shareholding Pattern (Dec 2013)
Figure 30 GAEL- Revenue distribution (March 2013)
Figure 31 Anil Ltd- Shareholding pattern (Dec 2013)
Figure 32 Anil Ltd- Revenue distribution (March 2013)

Table 1 Machinery for starch plant
Table 2 Machinery for liquid glucose & dextrose plant
Table 3 Machinery for sorbitol plant
Table 4 Qty of starch sold by selected producers (2009-11)
Table 5 Qty of Glucose and dextrose sold by selected producers (2007-11)
Table 6 Qty of Sorbitol sold by selected producers
Table 7 Capacity addition in Maize processing industry
Table 8 Glucose & Dextrose production by selected producers (2007-11)
Table 9 Production qty of Sorbitol by selected producers (2007-11)
Table 10 Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Plant locations (March 2013)
Table 11 Sukhjit Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Financial Summary (2011-13)
Table 12 Tirupati Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Plant locations (March 2013)
Table 13 Tirupati Starch & Chemicals Ltd- Financial summary (2011-13)
Table 14 GAEL- Plant locations (March 2013)
Table 15 GAEL- Financial summary (2011-13)
Table 16 Anil Ltd- Plant locations (March 2013)
Table 17 Anil Ltd- Financial Summary (2011-13)

^ Top

Sample Chapters


(Following is an extract of the content from the book)
Hide Down

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Maize (Botanical name: Zea Mays L) is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It is also one of the most important cereal crops globally and in India it is the third most important crop after rice and wheat.  Maize, also known as corn, is a versatile crop grown over a range of agro climatic zones. In fact the suitability of maize to diverse environments is unmatched by any other crop and even every part of the maize plant has economic value: the grain, leaves, stalk, tassel, and cob can all be used to produce a large variety of food and non-food products. As it has yield potential far higher than any other cereal, it is sometimes referred to as the miracle crop or the ‘Queen of Cereals’.

Maize is processed to different products which serve industries like Paper, Textile, Pharmaceutical, Poultry and Food & Confectionary.

Trends:

·         Emergence of Corn oil

·         Corn to Ethanol

·        Innovation uses of corn starch

The growth in the consumer industries on the back of low consumption, higher disposable incomes and evolving consumer tastes will trickle down to the maize processing industry. Various changes in the Indian spending patterns as well as consumption boom in the nation have given maize products increased applicability and hence the demand for maize products is ascending.  Maize processing in India is fragmented and quite unorganized which limits us to capture the exact size of the industry.   Industry in the past has grown at a healthy rate and we estimate it to continue its ride at the same velocity. We anticipate the maize consumption to rise to 25.2 million tonnes by 2016-17E.

1.     OVERVIEW

Maize (Botanical name: Zea Mays L) is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It is also one of the most important cereal crops globally and in India it is the third most important crop after rice and wheat. 

Maize, also known as corn, is a versatile crop grown over a range of agro climatic zones. In fact the suitability of maize to diverse environments is unmatched by any other crop and even every part of the maize plant has economic value: the grain, leaves, stalk, tassel, and cob can all be used to produce a large variety of food and non-food products. As it has yield potential far higher than any other cereal, it is sometimes referred to as the miracle crop or the ‘Queen of Cereals’.

The Global Scenario

In 2011-12, world maize production stood at 854 million tonnes. US dominates the world production of maize with nearly 37% of the total production, followed by China at ~21%. World maize production was estimated to be 950 million tons for 2012-2013, an increase of ~11% from 2011-2012. The chart below demonstrates the share of top maize producing countries in world maize production.

Figure 1 Top Maize producing countries in the world

Source: Industry Data

The Indian Scenario

Maize in India is an important cereal, and both the area under cultivation and production levels have steadily increased during the past two decades. In India, it is mainly used for poultry feed.

In India, the major maize producing areas are Andhra Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Orissa, Punjab, Rajasthan, Sikkim, Tamil Nadu, Tripura, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.

Soils

Maize  can  be  grown  successfully  in  variety  of  soils  ranging  from  loamy  sand  to  clay  loam. However, soils with good organic matter content having high water holding capacity with neutral pH are considered good for higher productivity.  Being  a  sensitive  crop  to  moisture  stress particularly  excess  soil  moisture  and  salinity  stresses;  it  is  desirable  to  avoid  low  lying  fields having  poor  drainage  and  also  the  field  having  higher  salinity.  Therefore, the fields having provision of proper drainage should be selected for cultivation of maize.

Time of sowing

Maize  can  be  grown  in  all  seasons  viz;  Kharif  (monsoon),  post  monsoon,  Rabi  (winter)  and spring.  During  Rabi  and  spring  seasons  to  achieve  higher  yield  at  farmer’s  field,  assured irrigation  facilities  are  required.  During  Kharif    season  it  is  desirable  to  complete  the  sowing  operation  12-15 days  before the onset of monsoon. However, in rainfed areas, the sowing time should be coincided with onset of monsoon.

 

Uses of Maize in India

Maize has varied uses in India, varying from feed to industrial products. The crop is primarily, more than 50%, used for poultry feed, nearly one-fifth used for human consumption (Food) and the rest is used in breweries as well as for industrial products. It is used as a basic raw material for the production of starch, oil and protein, alcoholic beverages, food sweeteners and, more recently, fuel. The chart below demonstrates the consumption pattern of corn in India.

Figure 2 Consumption pattern of maize in India

Source: Directorate of Maize Research

Maize which is not used for feed or human consumption is processed to obtain its by-products which acts as a raw material for different industries. Of lately maize processing has gathered momentum in India and is gaining importance in the associated industries. The most common industrial by product of maize is starch or corn starch or corn flour.

 

 

1.1           MAIZE PROCESSING METHODS & BY PRODUCTS

Maize can be processed in two ways- dry milling and wet milling.

Dry Milling

In dry corn milling, the corn or Maize is tempered and cleaned with hot water and steamed for about 2-6 hours to soften the bran and the germ so that it becomes easier for them to be separated from the endosperm. The coarse, granular material is sifted using a sifter machine and then the miller extracts the oil and the corn flour from the kernel.

Wet Milling

The process begins with the corn kernels being soaked in large tanks called steep tanks in a dilute aqueous sulfur dioxide solution. The softened kernel is then processed to remove the germ which is further processed to remove the high-value corn oil. The Germ Meal remaining after the oil is extracted and marketed for animal feed use.

Following germ removal, the remaining kernel components are screened to remove the fiber. The fiber is combined with the evaporated, concentrated and dried steep liquor and other co-product streams to produce Corn Gluten Feed. The starch and gluten protein subsequently pass through the screens and the starch-gluten slurry is sent to centrifugal separators where the lighter gluten protein and the heavier starch are separated. The gluten protein is then concentrated and dried to produce Corn Gluten Meal, a 60% protein feed.

Some of the starch is then washed and dried or modified and dried. These starch products are marketed to the food, paper, and textile industries. The remaining starch can be processed into products such as sweeteners or ethanol. While the wet milling process is capital intensive with higher operating costs, the ability to produce a variety of products can be valuable in dealing with volatile markets. The wet milling process results in slightly lower ethanol yields than a traditional dry milling process since some of the fermentable starch exits the process attached to the saleable co-products.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Maize (Botanical name: Zea Mays L) is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It is also one of the most important cereal crops globally and in India it is the third most important crop after rice and wheat.  Maize, also known as corn, is a versatile crop grown over a range of agro climatic zones. In fact the suitability of maize to diverse environments is unmatched by any other crop and even every part of the maize plant has economic value: the grain, leaves, stalk, tassel, and cob can all be used to produce a large variety of food and non-food products. As it has yield potential far higher than any other cereal, it is sometimes referred to as the miracle crop or the ‘Queen of Cereals’. Maize is processed to different products which serve industries like Paper, Textile, Pharmaceutical, Poultry and Food & Confectionary. Trends: •    Emergence of Corn oil •    Corn to Ethanol •    Innovation uses of corn starch The growth in the consumer industries on the back of low consumption, higher disposable incomes and evolving consumer tastes will trickle down to the maize processing industry. Various changes in the Indian spending patterns as well as consumption boom in the nation have given maize products increased applicability and hence the demand for maize products is ascending.  Maize processing in India is fragmented and quite unorganized which limits us to capture the exact size of the industry.   Industry in the past has grown at a healthy rate and we estimate it to continue its ride at the same velocity. We anticipate the maize consumption to rise to 25.2 million tonnes by 2016-17E.  1.    OVERVIEW Maize (Botanical name: Zea Mays L) is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It is also one of the most important cereal crops globally and in India it is the third most important crop after rice and wheat.   Maize, also known as corn, is a versatile crop grown over a range of agro climatic zones. In fact the suitability of maize to diverse environments is unmatched by any other crop and even every part of the maize plant has economic value: the grain, leaves, stalk, tassel, and cob can all be used to produce a large variety of food and non-food products. As it has yield potential far higher than any other cereal, it is sometimes referred to as the miracle crop or the ‘Queen of Cereals’. The Global Scenario In 2011-12, world maize production stood at 854 million tonnes. US dominates the world production of maize with nearly 37% of the total production, followed by China at ~21%. World maize production was estimated to be 950 million tons for 2012-2013, an increase of ~11% from 2011-2012. The chart below demonstrates the share of top maize producing countries in world maize production. Figure 1 Top Maize producing countries in the world   Source: Industry Data The Indian Scenario Maize in India is an important cereal, and both the area under cultivation and production levels have steadily increased during the past two decades. In India, it is mainly used for poultry feed. In India, the major maize producing areas are Andhra Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Orissa, Punjab, Rajasthan, Sikkim, Tamil Nadu, Tripura, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. Soils Maize  can  be  grown  successfully  in  variety  of  soils  ranging  from  loamy  sand  to  clay  loam. However, soils with good organic matter content having high water holding capacity with neutral pH are considered good for higher productivity.  Being  a  sensitive  crop  to  moisture  stress particularly  excess  soil  moisture  and  salinity  stresses;  it  is  desirable  to  avoid  low  lying  fields having  poor  drainage  and  also  the  field  having  higher  salinity.  Therefore, the fields having provision of proper drainage should be selected for cultivation of maize. Time of sowing Maize  can  be  grown  in  all  seasons  viz;  Kharif  (monsoon),  post  monsoon,  Rabi  (winter)  and spring.  During  Rabi  and  spring  seasons  to  achieve  higher  yield  at  farmer’s  field,  assured irrigation  facilities  are  required.  During  Kharif    season  it  is  desirable  to  complete  the  sowing  operation  12-15 days  before the onset of monsoon. However, in rainfed areas, the sowing time should be coincided with onset of monsoon. Uses of Maize in India Maize has varied uses in India, varying from feed to industrial products. The crop is primarily, more than 50%, used for poultry feed, nearly one-fifth used for human consumption (Food) and the rest is used in breweries as well as for industrial products. It is used as a basic raw material for the production of starch, oil and protein, alcoholic beverages, food sweeteners and, more recently, fuel. The chart below demonstrates the consumption pattern of corn in India. Figure 2 Consumption pattern of maize in India   Source: Directorate of Maize Research Maize which is not used for feed or human consumption is processed to obtain its by-products which acts as a raw material for different industries. Of lately maize processing has gathered momentum in India and is gaining importance in the associated industries. The most common industrial by product of maize is starch or corn starch or corn flour. 1.1    MAIZE PROCESSING METHODS & BY PRODUCTS Maize can be processed in two ways- dry milling and wet milling. Dry Milling In dry corn milling, the corn or Maize is tempered and cleaned with hot water and steamed for about 2-6 hours to soften the bran and the germ so that it becomes easier for them to be separated from the endosperm. The coarse, granular material is sifted using a sifter machine and then the miller extracts the oil and the corn flour from the kernel. Wet Milling The process begins with the corn kernels being soaked in large tanks called steep tanks in a dilute aqueous sulfur dioxide solution. The softened kernel is then processed to remove the germ which is further processed to remove the high-value corn oil. The Germ Meal remaining after the oil is extracted and marketed for animal feed use. Following germ removal, the remaining kernel components are screened to remove the fiber. The fiber is combined with the evaporated, concentrated and dried steep liquor and other co-product streams to produce Corn Gluten Feed. The starch and gluten protein subsequently pass through the screens and the starch-gluten slurry is sent to centrifugal separators where the lighter gluten protein and the heavier starch are separated. The gluten protein is then concentrated and dried to produce Corn Gluten Meal, a 60% protein feed. Some of the starch is then washed and dried or modified and dried. These starch products are marketed to the food, paper, and textile industries. The remaining starch can be processed into products such as sweeteners or ethanol. While the wet milling process is capital intensive with higher operating costs, the ability to produce a variety of products can be valuable in dealing with volatile markets. The wet milling process results in slightly lower ethanol yields than a traditional dry milling process since some of the fermentable starch exits the process attached to the saleable co-products.

^ Top


blog comments powered by Disqus

Post   Reviews

Please Sign In to post reviews and comments about this product.

About NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES

Hide Down

NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES (NPCS) is a reliable name in the industrial world for offering integrated technical consultancy services. Its various services are: Pre-feasibility study, New Project Identification, Project Feasibility and Market Study, Identification of Profitable Industrial Project Opportunities, Preparation of Project Profiles and Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility Studies, Market Surveys and Studies, Preparation of Techno-Economic Feasibility Reports, Identification and Selection of Plant and Machinery, Manufacturing Process and or Equipment required, General Guidance, Technical and Commercial Counseling for setting up new industrial projects and industry.

NPCS also publishes varies technology books, directory, databases, detailed project reports, market survey reports on various industries and profit making business. Besides being used by manufacturers, industrialists and entrepreneurs, our publications are also used by Indian and overseas professionals including project engineers, information services bureau, consultants and consultancy firms as one of the input in their research.

^ Top

Products & Services

Others

Contact Us

My Account

Help

Payment Options

  • Credit Cards
  • Debit Cards
  • PayPal
  • Net Banking - (All Major Indian Banks)

We Process

  • Cards

Google Search


Search books



Subjects